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Thread: THE most STABLE OS in the World?

  1. #41
    PHP/PostgreSQL guy
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    I would have to say, if my life depended on the OS staying up without fail, to the degree of 99.99999% of the time, I'd go with the following:

    Slackware: similar to gore, can't get it to actually crash.

    As far as corporate OS', there's only one real answer I think I'd go with.

    Solaris 10: with zones and containers and the 128-bit zfs filesystem (no, the z no longer stands for zettabyte, per Sun at the bootcamp I was at), virtualization is at a whole new level not to mention in cooperation with SPARC hardware, the 4 threads per core makes for great performance.

    What I wouldn't run it on:

    Redhat anything...
    Microsoft anything...
    Gentoo...dumbed down linux IMHO.
    Mandrake...RH clone IMHO.
    We the willing, led by the unknowing, have been doing the impossible for the ungrateful. We have done so much with so little for so long that we are now qualified to do just about anything with almost nothing.

  2. #42
    Junior Member zodiac's Avatar
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    Re: THE most STABLE OS in the World?

    What? No mention of OS/2?

    When I worked at IBM supporting it (OS/2.1 thru OS/2 Warp Server) the OS was very stable. There were no virus' that I can recall.

    Its downfall was lack of sufficient marketing, lack of support by IBM, and MS' marketshare.

    We had a lot of big companies using it, including the FBI.

    Not to mention, a lot of banks ran some flavor of OS/2 on their ATMs.

    Now, most (all?) run some flavor of Windows. Not too stable. I've had a couple crash on me and reboot when trying to get money or deposit.

    Fortunately, when that happens the ATM kicks the card back out!
    Misery is not my friend, but I\'ll break before I bend.

  3. #43
    Senior Member roswell1329's Avatar
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    Another OS to mention when it comes to stability and security is MPE/ix. Most financial institutions STILL run much of their mission-critical applications on MPE. Personally, I can't STAND it. The interface blows goats, and you need to know COBOL to get anything done in it. However, if it just had to RUN, I might bet my life on a properly configured MPE machine.
    /* You are not expected to understand this. */

  4. #44
    Just a Virtualized Geek MrLinus's Avatar
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    However, if it just had to RUN, I might bet my life on a properly configured MPE machine.
    (emphasis mine)

    This, I believe, is the punch line for any stable OS: is it properly configured on approved hardware? When the mix is high, makes it hard to stabilize. An OS by itself isn't a true indication of its stability when you have to consider other factors like various hardware, etc.
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  5. #45
    Senior Member gore's Avatar
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    For hardware? Now, this is of course because I only have PCs, but... Why would hardware matter at all? Obviously you don't want cheap hardware that fails, but a properly cooled system running Free BSD and another running Linux, and another running Windows NT, I can be pretty sure in that the first two won't go down until the hardware dies.

    Remember, Microsoft back in the day said Windows NT should be rebooted for leaks to be fixed every 30 or 60 days.

    That is one reason why I don't count on Windows for stability. XP might be somewhat btter as is 2003, but still, these are all based on NT and so is Vista. I just can't put my life on the line on something when 30 - 60 days after it came up it needs a reboot coming from the company who made it.

    When I think stability, I think *NIX.

    As has been pointed out, I've never once seen Slackware or BSD crash, and I've never seen SUSE crash and actually need a reboot. I've had core dumps, and I didn't need to reboot even for that. Actually MsMittens I think you were in the thread, I had a core dump from a floppy drive. I didn't even need to reboot and the box kept going.

    Core dump = in Windows, Blue Screen. Blue Screen in Windows = Reboot.

    Just to keep this going good:

    I want to add some twists for people who've replied already and anyone who hasn't:

    Say for a minute that the OS in question must run on PC hardware. What's it going to be?

    For another one, say it can run on a Server... Now what's it going to be?

    Now pick one that has to run on Sparc hardware.

    And now pick one no matter what. You pick Hardware and software.

    The OSs I chose all run on each of these, so I don't need to count another answer.

    I can't say who or where, but I know someone who's runnign SUSE 9.3 Professional on a Mainframe right now. They say it's stable as crap too. RedHat runs on the same machine and uses twice as many resources, and the system load almost doubles.

    That's why I said no RedHat with MY life on the line.

    SUSE, Slackware, FreeBSD, Solaris.

  6. #46
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    Because I know it best, I would use Gentoo.
    It runs on many, many platforms, and it is truly stable. It just provides you with a lot of freedom to break things (like giving you GCC-4.1 on an ALPHA box), but that doesn't mean you have to use it. Likewise, because I can compile things and update portage doesn't mean I will.

    The only issue is that there is no real 'out of the box' Gentoo... As it requires some configuration. Still, once it runs, it doesn't crash unless I force it to (which usually requires some acrobatics).
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  7. #47
    Senior Member gore's Avatar
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    Originally posted here by Trevoke
    Because I know it best, I would use Gentoo.
    Lol, now this is just a guess, but when you go under the knife, I REALLY doubt they are going to wake you up like "Hey man, don't move your chest is open, but how do you restart an app on this thing?". lol.

  8. #48
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    *chuckle*
    But it really doesn't crash once it's installed.. :-)
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