So do we fcukin' swear too much??
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  1. #1
    Just a Virtualized Geek MrLinus's Avatar
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    So do we fcukin' swear too much??

    This debate ends up on forums every now and again. The battle of free speech versus "good manners". Well, this article has some interesting insights:

    CNN

    Who gives a @#$% about profanity?
    Poll says 75% of women and 60% of men don't like swearwords

    Tuesday, March 28, 2006; Posted: 9:11 p.m. EST (02:11 GMT)

    (AP) -- This is a story about words we can't print in this story.

    You probably hear these words often, and more than ever before. But even though we can't print them, we can certainly ask: Are we living in an Age of Profanity?

    Nearly three-quarters of Americans questioned last week -- 74 percent -- said they encounter profanity in public frequently or occasionally, according to an Associated Press-Ipsos poll. Two-thirds said they think people swear more than they did 20 years ago. And as for, well, the gold standard of foul words, a healthy 64 percent said they use the F-word -- ranging from several times a day (8 percent) to a few times a year (15 percent).

    Just ask Joe Cormack. Like any bartender, Cormack, of Fort Dodge, Iowa, hears a lot of talk. He's not really offended by bad language -- heck, he uses it himself every day. But sometimes, a customer will unleash the F-word so many times, Cormack just has to jump in.

    "Do you have any idea how many times you've just said that?" he reports saying from time to time. "I mean, if I take that out of your vocabulary, you've got nothin'!"

    And it's not just at the bar. Or on TV. (Or on the Senate floor, for that matter, where Vice President Dick Cheney used the F-word in a heated argument two years ago.)

    At the community college where Cormack studies journalism, students will occasionally inject foul language into classroom discussions.

    Irene Kramer, a grandmother in Scranton, Pennsylvania, gets her ears singed when passing by the high school near her home.

    "What we hear, it's gross," says Kramer, 67. "I tell them, 'I have a dictionary and a Roget's Thesaurus, and I don't see any of those words in there!' I don't understand why these parents allow it."

    For Kramer, a major culprit is television. "Do I have to be insulted right there in my own home?" she asks. "I'm not going to pay $54 a month for cable and listen to that garbage." And yet she feels it's not a lost cause. "If people say 'Look, I don't want you talking that way,' if they demand it, it's going to have to change."

    In that battle, Kramer has a willing comrade: Judith Martin, who writes the syndicated Miss Manners column.

    "Is it inevitable?" Martin asked in a recent interview. "Well, if it were inevitable I wouldn't be doing my job." The problem, she says, is that people who are offended aren't speaking up about it.

    "Everybody is pretending they aren't shocked," Martin says, "and gradually people WON'T be shocked. And then those who want to be offensive will find another way."

    Perhaps not surprisingly, profanity seems to divide people by age and by gender.

    Younger people admit to using bad language more often than older people; they also encounter it more and are less bothered by it. The AP-Ipsos poll suggested that 62 percent of 18 to 34-year-olds acknowledged swearing in conversation at least a few times a week, compared to 39 percent of those 35 and older.

    More women than men said they encounter people swearing more now than 20 years ago -- 75 percent, compared to 60 percent. Also, more women said they were bothered by profanity -- 74 percent at least some of the time -- than men (60 percent.) And more men admitted to swearing: 54 percent at least a few times a week, compared to 39 percent of women.

    Wondering specifically about the F-word? Thirty-two percent of men said they used it at least a few times a week, compared to 23 percent of women.

    "That word doesn't even mean what it means anymore," says Larry Riley of Warren, Michigan. "It has just become part of the culture." Riley admits to using the F-word a few times a week. And his wife? "She never swears."

    A striking common note among those interviewed, swearers or not: They don't like it when people swear for no good reason.

    Darla Ramirez, for example, says she hates hearing the F-word "when people are just having a plain old conversation." The 40-year-old housewife from Arlington, Texas, will hear "people talking about their F-ing car, or their F-ing job. I'll hear it walking down the street, or at the shopping mall, or at Wal-Mart.

    "What they do in their own home is their business, but when I'm out I don't need to hear people talking trashy," Ramirez says. She admits to swearing about once a month -- but not the F-word.

    And Donnell Neal of Madison Lake, Minnesota, notes how she'll hear the F-word used as a mere form of emphasis, as in: "That person scared the f--- out of me!" Neal, 26, who works with disabled adults, says she swears only in moments of extreme frustration, "like if someone cuts me off when I'm driving, or if I'm carrying something and someone shuts the door in my face." Even then, she says, she'll likely use "milder cuss words" -- and never at work.

    The AP poll questioned 1,001 adults on March 20-22, with a margin of error of plus or minus 3 percentage points.

    For those who might find the results depressing, there's possibly a silver lining: Many of those who swear think it's wrong nonetheless.

    Like Steven Price, a security guard in Tonawanda, New York, who admits to using swear words -- including the F-word, several times a day -- with colleagues or buddies, "like any old word."

    Price, 31, still gets mad at himself for doing it, worries about the impact of profanity (especially from TV) on his children, and regrets the way things have evolved since he was a kid.

    "As I get older, the more things change," says Price. "And I kind of wish they had stayed the same."
    But I'm sorry. I do get a huge chuckle out of Cartman's "fuc.kity, fuc.k, fuc.k, fuc.k" from the movie.
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  2. #2
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    And no matter what that grandma says, the f-word is in the dictionary

    Etymology: akin to Dutch fokken to breed (cattle)
    Figures

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    Personally, I think there's nothing wrong with swearing in the right circumstances...we shouldn't deprive ourselves of the most expressive words in the english language just because of some archaic and prudish notion that there's some ethical or socially unacceptable reason they should be avoided and, are still offensive to some people.

    The only time it gets on my nerves is when they're used out of context...like when you're having a regular conversation and it's f@ck this and mother-f@ck#r that...and you're talking about eg. bicycles.

    Eg

  4. #4
    The ******* Shadow dalek's Avatar
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    I agree, it really irks me, when during a debate about something, it degenerates into a who can cuss the most, which basically tells me the other person now has nothing to say...that's appropriate to what was being discussed in the first place.



    I find a lot of people have lost the art of sarcasm/wit and replaced it with swearing, not as much stress on the brain cells I guess....

    As to my personal views on the subject, [family-oriented]shucks[/family-oriented], I spent 20 yrs amongst some of the saltiest language in the world (Navy)...the more beer that get's consumed the saltier.....
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    I find a lot of people have lost the art of sarcasm/wit and replaced it with swearing, not as much stress on the brain cells I guess....
    Personally, I prefer using a properly placed cuss word mixed in with sarcasm and wit!
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    Right turn Clyde Nokia's Avatar
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    But I'm sorry. I do get a huge chuckle out of Cartman's "fuc.kity, fuc.k, fuc.k, fuc.k" from the movie
    Ha Ha! Thats just made me want to go and watch it again!

    "Did you just call me fat you *****in Jew!......Eric did you just say the F word ......... what ............ Jew .......?! "

    I is off to find the DVD!
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  7. #7
    Wow well the people around me use the F wor so much i dont even think of it as a bad word anymore...i probably use it couple times a day too. But then again I'm 19
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    Old people tend to reflect upon better times of greater honour, romance and basic chivalry. What they tend to forget is that with those things came a much greater and often daunting thing. Separation. THink about it... THe more liberal america becomes the less separation between classes, sexes, races there are.

    I am sure Mother Goose and her friend would willingly give up their right to vote to keep people from swearing. I am not sure many other women will feel the same way though.

    And you can't demand anything of another person. If you are offended at someone swearing in public excuse yourself and get out of ear range with them.

    This is sadly just another excuse of someone with nothing to do in their old age trying to find something to give them a purpose.

    And since the lady is such a keen observer of what people say. I am sure she is as keen to understand that if she opens up a book and reads... Possibly a dictionary... SHe will find almost every cuss word. And if not in there definately on webster.com


    I hate old people that have nothing to do.


    Neg..

    1 usually obscene : to engage in coitus with -- sometimes used interjectionally with an object (as a personal or reflexive pronoun) to express anger, contempt, or disgust
    2 usually vulgar : to deal with unfairly or harshly

  9. #9
    Right turn Clyde Nokia's Avatar
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    I hate old people that have nothing to do
    They may have nothing to do now but I can guarentee you they will have been through and seen more than most of us ever will. Think about it (your in the USA right) - 2 world wars, Korea, Cold war, Vietnam, The Great Depression to name just a few. - Where lucky in the fact that it is unlikely we will have to live through similar things.

    Life was different when they grew up, if it was still like that now the world would be a lot better place - They have earnt the right to "sit there and do nothing" and deserve the respect of their jounior's.
    When they grew up swearing was a big issue - why should they look at it any different now?
    Todays society may now frown on it as theirs did, but thats just one of the reasons thw world is in the state it is in now!
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    You talk of them going through wars then say language wasn't as bad when they were young. Talk to a vet bud, curse words flew around like crazy in the military, always have, always will.

    People usually get an image of their life as a young person and hold on to that more perfect image their entire lives, even if it is not a truthful representation of their youth.
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