Google In China
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Thread: Google In China

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2003

    Angry Google In China

    Hello Guys!

    I am in China right now! may for few yrs

    Google in china is banned or somehow limited, itís hard to open the Google site if you are lucky homepage will open but search results will not open.

    Google video is banned 100%, if it opens and you try to playback this the msg is displayed

    Thanks for your interest in Google Video.

    Currently, the playback feature of Google Video isn't available in your country.

    We hope to make this feature available more widely in the future, and we really appreciate
    your patience.


    Geocities not working
    blogspot same
    msn pathetically working
    Everything is in Chinese

    Is there a possibility of downloading the Google video in china?

  2. #2
    Senior Member kr5kernel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    I read some article, maybe in 2600, about the ability to have google in china translate into english. Pages that were blocked would then work. Perhaps somethign to look into?
    (kr5kernel at hotmail dot com)
    Linux: Making Penguins Cool Since 1994.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Is there a possibility of downloading the Google video in china?
    Try using
    \"And life is what we make it. Always has been, always will be.\"

  4. #4
    Senior Member hesperus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    The firewall is largely ineffective at preventing the flow of information and is rather easily circumvented by determined parties by using proxy servers outside the firewall. VPN and ssh connections to outside mainland China are not blocked, so circumventing all of the censorship and monitoring features of the Great Firewall of China is trivial for those who have these secure connection methods to computers outside mainland China available to them.

    Neither the Tor website or network are blocked, making Tor (in conjunction with Privoxy) an easily acquired and effective tool for circumvention of the censorship controls. Tor maintains a public list of entry nodes, so the authorities could easily block it if they had the inclination. According to the Tor FAQ sections 6.4 and 7.9, Tor is vulnerable to timing analysis by Chinese authorities, so it allows a breach of anonymity. Thus for the moment, Tor allows uncensored downloads and uploads, although no guarantee can be made with regard to freedom from repercussions.

    In addition to Tor, there are various HTTP/HTTPS Tunnel Services, which work in a similar way as Tor. At least one of them, Your Freedom, is confirmed to be working from China and also offers encryption features for the transmitted traffic.

    It was common in the past to use Google's cache feature to view blocked websites. However, this feature of Google seems to be under some level of blocking, as access is now erratic and does not work for blocked websites. Currently the block is mostly circumvented by using proxy servers outside the firewall, and is not difficult to carry out for those determined to do so. Some well-known proxy servers have also been blocked.

    Some Chinese citizens use the Google Mirror elgooG after China blocked Google. It is believed that elgooG survived the Great Firewall of China because the firewall operators thought that elgooG was not a fully functional version of Google.

    As Falun Gong websites are generally inaccessible from mainland China, practitioners have launched a company named UltraReach Internet Corp and developed a piece of software named UltraSurf to enable people in mainland China to access restricted web sites via Internet Explorer without being detected.

    Other techniques used include Freenet, a peer-to-peer distributed data store allowing members to anonymously send or retrieve information, and TriangleBoy.

    Another common way of sneaking illegal information is the use of cellular phones and text messaging, though these are also monitored by the government.

    Basically, the answer is to use an proxy of one form or another that isn't blocked by the authorities, but be very careful. I don't know the situation in China very well, but it could well land you in a place lacking far more than Google video . . . .

  5. #5
    Senior Member nihil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    United Kingdom: Bridlington

    China is a very difficult country to analyse at the moment, both economically and politically (yes, I do have academic qualifications in those subjects )

    Historically, they have had an isolationist policy for 2,000 years or more, so it is sort of built into their ethos and culture?

    They built the Great Wall? In the days of the "Opium Wars" they had special enclaves for foreigners? they use Hong Kong and Macao as a sort of "cordon sanitaire"?

    Google are new boys in China, and are treading very carefully right now, as it is a market with enormous revenue potential, and they are dealing with a "customer" who does not really understand, or know what they want to do. Sure, they fully understand the technology, but what about the cultural implications and political ramifications?

    I think that the Chinese authorities really do not have a fully formulated policy regarding the internet, but are mortally afraid of it because they see it as something that they cannot control.

    I am sure that you can imagine the effect that something like the internet would have on a culture that has experienced thousands of years of totalitarianism and isolationism?

    That said, why are you in China, and in what capacity?

    The reason I ask is that when we work on secure sites or have outsiders working on ours, we tend to use direct dial-up and/or virtual private networks. So, if a guy from a supplier, customer or sub-contractor comes onto our site, we give him a direct line with 56.6 and ADSL so his laptop will work with it.

    Where we have a permanent base situation we give them a VPN through the non-secure network.

    I think that is a sort of microcosm of the current Chinese situation. They want to embrace the technology, but are unsure of how to do so in a way that is safe to them (their ideology).

    You have the advantage of being a foreigner (I presume ) so you would not make a suitable insurgent or even an agent see, the isolationism runs right through the culture.

    Please give that some thought................and be very careful

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Just my curiosity !

    Will the use of connecting to a proxy server serve his purpose. I mean when i use a proxy server via italy for that matter i get the default google page in italian language. This means that while accessing google the server assumes that it has a request from a specific country and displays the page accordingly.

    If the service is available in USA and he connects to a proxy server there and opens google he may get the google video option. Is there a way chinese can fix this thing. There are numerous proxy servers in the world and many are free. Its impossible to ban all of them.

    I also know there are ways to connect to multiple proxy servers but i dont know how to do that. Can anyone guide me for the same.

    I have a lot less knowledge than many here so forgive and rectify any error in the above stated things. This is just my take on things.
    \"The Smilie Wars\" ... just arrived after the great crusades

    .... computers come to the rescue .... ah technology at last has some use.

  7. #7
    Senior Member nihil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    United Kingdom: Bridlington
    Mystery Man I am sorry to repeat myself, but I do believe that this is just "Chinese growing pains"

    The internet is a real mess as far as international law and the like goes, so you can imagine the reaction amongst politicians Worldwide............ their bullcrap gets detected too fast

    As for proxies................just steer on to the site that has your language?

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