When does a game cross the "line"
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Thread: When does a game cross the "line"

  1. #1

    When does a game cross the "line"

    I was thinking of replying to a question posted in another thread, and it prompted me to wonder, when does a game cross the line?

    In my case, Quake 4 did it with the cyborg babies, which was just too much for me to handle. The operation where "my" legs were removed was bad enough, and I almost stopped playing there.

    Postal was played briefly but it took bad taste so far that it was satirical. It got quickly deleted.

    Battlefield Vietnam was fun, but I stopped playing it as I realised that the generation before mine had, at my age, fought in the war being played out on my screen.

    The same goes for the Grand Theft Auto series, which are satirical fun, but eventually my conscience suggests that perhaps beating up prostitutes is not the best use of my leisure time, and I switch to something else.

    So I'm asking, when does a game cross the line, and why?

  2. #2
    Just a Virtualized Geek MrLinus's Avatar
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    It's been a while since I've played FPS type games and haven't found one yet that I would say crosses a line in gorefest kinda stuff. Granted I haven't played anything recently. I remember playing Duke Nuke'em and actually laughing at it through most of the game. Some were offended by the sexism. Depending on how bad the gore is, it might offend me or make me not want to play a bit..

    I've mostly played online text-interactive games (kinda like RPGs). Some of those can cross the line between game-play and personal attacks. Those kinds of line crossings I find more disturbing than say a FPS gorefest because I know the gorefest is just "schlock" for the sake of "shlock" whereas personal attacks are meant more seriously.
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    I would suggest that a game crosses the line when you begin to do things to other people that you wouldn't do in real life and you wouldn't won't done to you.

    I'm not much of a gamer, the only games I have are Chromium and SuperTux (free). For me, it's one thing to jump on a snowball character and squash it, it would be another to do the same thing to a character who was a simulated human being.

    I may have more thoughts, additions, corrections later
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    AO Soccer Mom debwalin's Avatar
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    I think crossing the line is a very personal question. As you said, you've got your own lines. I've got mine. I really have a pretty high tolerance for stuff, but Grand Theft Auto pushed my buttons immediately. It didn't offend me so much as it made me think "This is stupid, this is pointless, and this is not what I want to spend my free time doing." Also, I had mommy guilt. I didn't even let my son know we had it, but I still felt really guilty playing it. I think for some people, myself included, that's where the line is. Would I be ashamed of my kids finding me playing this? If the answer to that is yes, then I don't play it. It's not really a conscious decision, it's just a way of life, I guess.

    Hard question to answer, but thought provoking. I'll be interested to see what other people say!
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    I don't think a game can ever really cross the line, nor do I think any other form of entertainment can really cross a line. It's a person's interpretation (that they bring about themselves, naturally) that crosses the line.

    Video games, and peoples' negative or positive interpretations of them (and, thus, in some political figures' power, the actions taken against them), reminds me a lot of this t-shirt I used to wear in high school, that I was suspended for on two different occasions for one day each time. The shirt said,

    "I don't give a %*#$!..."

    Now, why on Earth did I get in trouble? Because the teachers' interpretations of the shirt were that of something very negative, when in actuality the shirt had done nothing wrong in and of itself. They *assumed* in their own mind that it meant a curse word, which they did not allow on t-shirts in school, but what if the author had intended it to mean "I don't give a user... rights to my server"? Granted, it's horribly unlikely, but it certainly can't be ruled out of the question. But, because of the way they wanted to see it, it was deemed as a shirt that had, indeed, "crossed the line," and I got in trouble for it.

    Do you see what I mean? I don't think it's a matter of a game crossing a line, even if it's ultra-blatant. I believe it can cross *your* line, your personal comfort zone, but to say (or, in an extreme case, legislate) that there is *a* line that it can or cannot cross, is taking it too far in itself.

  6. #6
    Senior Member very_unhappy's Avatar
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    as far as violence goes... never (my opinion)

    as far as sex... only pedofilia (not like 19 on 16) but like (60 on 10)

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    The ******* Shadow dalek's Avatar
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    I think it's a sign of the times we live in, one of the first games I played was Table Top tennis in a bar, what was offensive was the price of beer :-) jk....

    I have played a few FPS games and for the most part thought nothing of it, as was mentioned, it is all about perspective and personal choice, but as long as developer's avoid the obvious taboos (Sexual Abuse, Bigotry, hate material) then what is there to worry about?


    For those that are quick to label these games as the root of all evil, I believe it's a generational thing, as I am sure if Tipper Gore had of been born a little later her and Frank Zappa may have gotten to know each other better, or wouldn't have gone after Ozzie (Black Sabbath), same with this new age of games, GTA may piss off a lot of the older types, but that's because of the time they grew up in..( I have never played the game so can't really say much about it).

    I remember reading a lot of hype around a game called "Manhunter", never played it, but apparently it's all about stalking and killing, is that going over the line...it's fantasy, have to learn what's real and what's playtime. The Military promote a game on line as a way to recruit, is that going over the line...?

    I am sure if I had Doom to play with in the 60's, (just imagine the games we would have now) the concepts and perspectives would be different today...
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    I don't think a game can ever really cross the line, nor do I think any other form of entertainment can really cross a line. It's a person's interpretation (that they bring about themselves, naturally) that crosses the line.
    Well, let's think about this. How about gladitorial contests? I think I would say the Romans went too far.
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    hey ... you can't compare gladiatorial games to a video games

    that's the whole point ... to be able to do what we cannot in real life
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    nor do I think any other form of entertainment can really cross a line
    Hi Kosmograd,
    read this part of the quote again. The OP says, "any other form of entertainment...." That's what I was addressing.
    I was wanting to challenge this particular statement.

    However, II do believe some video games cross the line.
    For the wages of sin is death, but the free gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.
    (Romans 6:23, WEB)

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