C/C++: the GCC(GNU) version
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: C/C++: the GCC(GNU) version

  1. #1
    Senior Member codenamevirus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Faridabad, Haryana, India
    Posts
    298

    C/C++: the GCC(GNU) version

    hi

    can u people give some links to online archives or e-books which will enable me to learn C/C++ the GNU's way. All these years, I have been using the Turbo C++ compiler and I now found out that its the GCC which is being used in the market now.

    Correct me, if I m wrong!!

    thnx
    CodeNameVirus

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    106

    Smile

    Hmmm...if you are using Linux and you want an IDE, I would suggest KDevelop. But if you want to learn more about the command line interface for the GCC, I would suggest the online documents.

    There are also numerous tutorials on using GCC:
    One from the U. of Chicago
    Compiling C/C++ programs on *nix
    GCC Tutorial from Wooster College
    And much much more!
    "The Texan turned out to be good-natured, generous and likeable. In three days no one could stand him." Catch 22 by Joseph Heller.

    Buddies? I have no buddies...


    Give the BSD daemon some love (proud FreeBSD user)

  3. #3
    Senior Member codenamevirus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Faridabad, Haryana, India
    Posts
    298
    HI

    Lemme clear somethings, I havent already. The main reason as a whole.

    I went a job fair held here in India. Many big brands such as MS, IBM, etc were present over there.

    In a seminar of all the groups together, they said, if a person has good skills in C/C++, Java and C#. That person could get a placement anywhere he wants in this world.

    So, starting with C/C++, my perception was that these giants are not actually asking for a Turbo C++ compiler but a more general one like GCC.

    I dun know whether I m correct or not. So, if there's any place I have deviated from the main path, plz tell me.

    thnx
    CodeNameVirus

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    106
    Well, I think that it doesn't matter what tools you use, inasmuchas it matters what languages you know.

    I would highly suggest that if you don't know C/C++ or Java to begin with Java because it's more programmer friendly. You get to focus on style more than bugs.

    But it really shouldn't matter what compiler you use (by the way, the GNU Compiler Collection work best on Unix-like operating systems; if you are using Windows I would highly suggest considering switching to BSD, or Linux, or something else).

    *DISCLAIMER: I haven't worked as a programmer (yet) so I am unfamiliar with the atmosphere of employment.*

    Good luck!
    "The Texan turned out to be good-natured, generous and likeable. In three days no one could stand him." Catch 22 by Joseph Heller.

    Buddies? I have no buddies...


    Give the BSD daemon some love (proud FreeBSD user)

  5. #5
    Senior Member codenamevirus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Faridabad, Haryana, India
    Posts
    298
    ok

    I got it. BTW, I have been working with C/C++ on the Borland Turbo C++ compiler for 5 years now.

    Also, do I need to switch to linux/unix in order to use the GNU version of C++. One more thing, I would like to know is, does every kind of compiler provide the same type of facilities.
    Like, I have seen projects about designing plugins, hardware drivers, etc. Can this be done in Turbo C++ compiler.

    Dun go to my name, I aint an advanced coder and my 5 yrs of C/C++ involved only basic projects. But, now I want to try out the advance versions of C++, so as to be able to work on hardcore projects.

    That's why, I thought of going to GNU, but if the Turbo compiler can do it, I think there's no need then to go to GNU but stay here with the turbo and further enhace my skills.

    So, if u can provide with that info, I'll b grateful!!!


    thnx
    CodeNameVirus

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    106
    Also, do I need to switch to linux/unix in order to use the GNU version of C++. One more thing, I would like to know is, does every kind of compiler provide the same type of facilities.
    Well, you can get CyGwin and install it on Windows. That will give you the Bourne Again Shell for Windows (it's an emulator of Linux I think, I can't remember what CyGwin is exactly).

    YOu can use GCC with this.

    But the GCC has different headers than the Turbo C++ Compiler, e.g. there is the unistd.h header for the GCC, etc.

    That's the only small problem, but it's not too big of a problem.

    Dun go to my name, I aint an advanced coder and my 5 yrs of C/C++ involved only basic projects. But, now I want to try out the advance versions of C++, so as to be able to work on hardcore projects.

    That's why, I thought of going to GNU, but if the Turbo compiler can do it, I think there's no need then to go to GNU but stay here with the turbo and further enhace my skills.
    Well, try more advanced things. Try writing a peer to peer filesharing program, or a compiler, or an operating system.

    I have tried only one of those things, and I learnt a profound amount about operating systems.

    Try looking through Fresh Meat for a project that is interesting and join it. The only way to get better is by practicing and trying things you never tried before.

    If you mess up, learn from it and say "Ahh, I should never try doing xxx ever again. Instead what I should do is yyy."

    I would encourage you to install the CyGwin emulator, and build up skills with the Bash shell, then when you think you are ready to cross over to the dark side...I mean, to Linux. THe reason why is because you can mess around with Linux, you can customize it to do what you want it to do. You can't do that on windows or Mac OS X.

    But you don't need fancy tools to become a good programmer. You need practice, and lots of it.

    *DISCLAIMER: I don't claim to be a good programmer, as a matter of fact there is probably a large body of angry people who say otherwise.*
    "The Texan turned out to be good-natured, generous and likeable. In three days no one could stand him." Catch 22 by Joseph Heller.

    Buddies? I have no buddies...


    Give the BSD daemon some love (proud FreeBSD user)

  7. #7
    Senior Member codenamevirus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Faridabad, Haryana, India
    Posts
    298
    Well, thnx arkimedes

    I'll check the info above and will return with what I experience there
    CodeNameVirus

  8. #8
    Custom User
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    503
    From reading this, I think you've got the totally wrong end of the stick here. If you already know C/C++, it shouldn't really matter what compiler you use (although obviously different compilers provide different features, deviate from the standards to different extents, etc). I personally use gcc and g++, but if you're happy with Turbo C++ and you haven't found any problems with it (i.e. you haven't encountered a problem that you cannot solve with it) then I don't see any reason why you should switch.

    My advice is that an employer in general isn't going to care what compiler you've used, what they will care about is whether you know the language - and in many cases they won't even care about that. If you want to become a good programmer, you need to focus more on learning to program (irrespective of language) and understanding all the different concepts that you will use in a professional environment.

    ac

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    106
    From reading this, I think you've got the totally wrong end of the stick here. If you already know C/C++, it shouldn't really matter what compiler you use (although obviously different compilers provide different features, deviate from the standards to different extents, etc).
    It depends what you're doing.

    If it is lowlevel, platform-dependent stuff, the headers change that "should" be used (although I understand there are ways around it).

    The stdlib.h, etc. are the same.

    I personally use gcc and g++, but if you're happy with Turbo C++ and you haven't found any problems with it (i.e. you haven't encountered a problem that you cannot solve with it) then I don't see any reason why you should switch.
    Exactly, it shouldn't matter what compiler you're using. It doesn't matter what you program with.

    What matters is how well you program. The tools you use is irrelevant.

    And how often you program, how hard you push yourself, etc. These are all somewhat important too.
    "The Texan turned out to be good-natured, generous and likeable. In three days no one could stand him." Catch 22 by Joseph Heller.

    Buddies? I have no buddies...


    Give the BSD daemon some love (proud FreeBSD user)

  10. #10
    Senior Member codenamevirus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Faridabad, Haryana, India
    Posts
    298
    so, u all want to say is, it doesnt matter what compiler u use, its all the same as a whole. Well, I havent recieved any problems yet in the Turbo compiler, then again I certainly dun know about how to go and make a plugin or a macro, etc. i.e. I want to learn the advance C++, and if the features are available in the Turbo version, ifs good for me.

    n thnx for clearing the employer doubt!!
    CodeNameVirus

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •