Wierd IP
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Thread: Wierd IP

  1. #1
    Antionline Herpetologist
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    Question Wierd IP

    OK, when I connected to my ISP using my DSL router, I just got a 59.xxx.42.0 IP. That's right, an IP ending with zero. Can anyone tell me how the HELL that could happen? The net connection works just fine.


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  2. #2
    Just a Virtualized Geek MrLinus's Avatar
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    Bad supernetting/DHCP range?
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  3. #3
    Senior Member Opus00's Avatar
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    if the network is flattened like a 255.255.252.0 broadcast and the starting subnet is 10.10.10.1 then the ending would be 10.10.13.254

    that should mean that 10.10.10.255 and 10.10.11.0 are in fact valid address that can be used, this is not only true in the private IP range, but also the public IP range.

    It is all defined within the NETWORK and BROADCAST variable of the network, that is also adhered to by the routers. Make sense?

    [edit]
    fixed fat fingered typos
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  4. #4
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    Hey Hey,

    This happens quite often with large ISPs and is due to Supernetting as Opus00 has mentioned... We saw it at the college with students... Several ISPs supernet but many places (because of SMURF attacks in the past) filter .255... This is what happened with our ISP.. So students who's ISPs had assigned them a valid, fully routable address ending in .255 were filtered from certain sites because of the nature of many places firewall setups...

    You may run into this problem with certain sites that do perform this filtering method, but other than that you shouldn't have a problem.. If you have your Subnet Mask we can tell you exactly what the valid ranges are and what the broadcast is for your range.

    Peace,
    HT
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  5. #5
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    I agree with Opus...he is right...the IP address is OKAY..and what if your subnet mask is 10.10.0.0?? all the adresses in the range 10.10.0.1 to 10.10.255.255 are valid ones. So it might be the case with you that you got such a "Wierd " Ip address!
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  6. #6
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    Originally posted here by jockey0109
    I agree with Opus...he is right...the IP address is OKAY..and what if your subnet mask is 10.10.0.0?? all the adresses in the range 10.10.0.1 to 10.10.255.255 are valid ones. So it might be the case with you that you got such a "Wierd " Ip address!
    You can't have a subnet mask of 10.10.0.0.... That's impossible.
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    PnCHd (Pronounced Pinched): Acronym - Point 'n Click Hacked. As in: "That website was pinched" or "The skiddie pinched my computer because I forgot to patch".

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