Bye-Bye to Random Airport Checks?
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Thread: Bye-Bye to Random Airport Checks?

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    Senior Member treanglin's Avatar
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    Bye-Bye to Random Airport Checks?

    A new system developed by an Israeli company utilises physiological and psychological responses assessed by a computer, rather than a human. It is due to go on trial at both a West Bank crossing point and a US airport, which is deliberately not being identified, later this year.
    -April 13 2006

    Neither the TSA nor Suspect Detection Systems Ltd., the Israeli company, will discuss the Knoxville trial, whose primary goal was to uncover the designated bad guys, not to identify threats among real travelers. They won't even say what questions were asked of travelers, though the system is generally designed to measure physical responses to hot-button questions like "Are you planning to immigrate illegally?" or "Are you smuggling drugs."
    August 14, 2006 The Wall Street Journal




    What I'm wondering is why haven’t the company's website discussed the results of the trials yet? In the Forbes article in their press section they say that they have a 96 % success rate after 2 years of testing. On other websites like the Journal, there are statements of around an 85 percent success rate.


    According to FT.com (Financial Times), They've not only tested the system in Israel but also in the U.S. There's no doubt that this is a huge opportunity for investors and stuff so as I see it, they should be bragging their brains out about the effectiveness of the technology so far......unless it's not living up to par with their expectations. Then again though, I guess that maybe they don't want some other company figuring out how the technology works before they tweak it to where it delivers an optimal success rate or whatever.
    "Do you know why the system is slow?" they ask

    "It's probably something to do with..." I look up today's excuse ".. clock speed"
    -BOFH

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    Re: Bye-Bye to Random Airport Checks?

    Originally posted here by treanglin
    -April 13 2006
    According to FT.com (Financial Times), They've not only tested the system in Israel but also in the U.S. There's no doubt that this is a huge opportunity for investors and stuff so as I see it, they should be bragging their brains out about the effectiveness of the technology so far......unless it's not living up to par with their expectations. Then again though, I guess that maybe they don't want some other company figuring out how the technology works before they tweak it to where it delivers an optimal success rate or whatever.

    Well the biggest problem with this technology and with the way that they test it is that they tell the testers how to act, and what to do, and then they turn the system up to see if it can detect them... The problem with this type of system, and the reason it will never get rid of random security stops is because it is very easy to teach people how to act normal in adverse situations. It is widely known and proven that certain government agencies including the military teach techniques on how to pass lie detector tests and other forms of interogation.. It is also common practice for police officers and other forms of under cover law enforcement officers to take classes on human behavior so that they can learn how to control their own behaviors.

    If you can teach a cop how to walk into a room full of murderers and smugglers, buy 2 million dollars worth of cocaine and walk out without anybody knowing that he isn't a cop, you could very easily train an extremist on how to get onto a plain without acting fishy..

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    Senior Member treanglin's Avatar
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    Well the testers how to act to so that they can create the algorithms and stuff but I'd guess that they have the trials mixed with human screening to determine what to change. It's safe to assume that at the trial in Knoxville the people in the airport were not coached right. So they use the data from the real people to tweak the system's accuracy. Of course they may never be able to completely get rid of the human investegators and detectors, but by developing the technology to handle this type of task now......I mean....Who knows what the future may hold?
    "Do you know why the system is slow?" they ask

    "It's probably something to do with..." I look up today's excuse ".. clock speed"
    -BOFH

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    Dissident 4dm1n brokencrow's Avatar
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    It reminds me of facial recognition technology. That worked real well at wheedling some big contracts out of a few outfits (in other words, it worked better on paper).

    edit -- a lit oogling...er...googling turned up the fact facial recognition tech is 'still alive and well'. Five years on from the first implementations, they're still working it out. Seems the Germans ran into a few kinks using it in their passport system.
    “Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.” — Will Rogers

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