About nating.
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Thread: About nating.

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    About nating.

    I like to ask one formal question.

    I think that ISP must provide public IP address to their customer from their pool of public IP addres. But I faced one suitation, my office provide us internet service from one ISP, but this ISP provide our gateway server a private IP address. I knew it by 'tracert' command. I think that they are using nating in their system to save their public IP address. Is this legal to provide private IP address by ISP to their customer.
    And in technical view, they use private IP address to save public IP addres. But, as my knowledge of nating, is'nt it littel bit delay in internet access due to the nat table translation between public and private IP address?

  2. #2
    AOs Resident Troll
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    all depends on the service contract that you signed\accepted with the isp...and of course the laws of the country you are in...and thelaws of the country the isp is in....this is what makes the internet laws "grey"

    I think cable companies use this type of architecture

    You on cable per chance??

    MLF
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  3. #3
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    Let's turn this around.. Why would it be illegal? AFAIK no country has any laws that says you MUST have a public Internet address.

    Perhaps you're seeing the RFC-1918 addresses on your own network? Perhaps the router has a public Internet address?

    And the delay when NAT'ting is sooooo small you'll have a really hard time noticing it. If you do notice it you should replace the router that's doing the NAT for a bigger one because it cannot handle the traffic.
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  4. #4
    Senior Member IKnowNot's Avatar
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    Not to change the subject, but

    I knew it by 'tracert' command.
    Could you please elaborate. The public IP address of my gateway does not show up when I use it.

    Did you talk to your admins who set up the gateway?
    " And maddest of all, to see life as it is and not as it should be" --Miguel Cervantes

  5. #5
    AO Guinness Monster MURACU's Avatar
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    As far as I know it is not only legal it is good pratice. An isp is limited in the number of public addresses it can have. As has been mentioned it would only cause porblems if you had a contract where you are meant to have a public address.
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  6. #6
    AO Curmudgeon rcgreen's Avatar
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    I can't imagine any laws against it, but IMO it is a cheapskate
    way to give inferior service. I am not aware of any ISPs doing
    it that way, but don't give them any ideas. Various services
    can't work properly behind a nat router because incoming
    packets can't reach you. Oh well, they don't want you to run
    that service anyway. You gotta pay more for a real connection.
    I came in to the world with nothing. I still have most of it.

  7. #7
    Antionline Herpetologist
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    I can't imagine any laws against it, but IMO it is a cheapskate way to give inferior service.
    Yeah, kinda. An ISP I once had an account with used a 1:1 NAT where each public IP was mapped to a private IP on the network. What this meant was, essentially, if you needed to play a game or something, your IP was invisible to you from within Windows. After going through their AUP with a fine toothed comb and finding nothing mentioned about bypassing the NAT, I set up DynDNS on my computer (I remember it was phishphreek that suggested it) and bypassed the whole damn thing.
    Needless to say, I switched ISPs as soon as a viable alternative was available.

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  8. #8
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    Originally posted here by rcgreen
    I can't imagine any laws against it, but IMO it is a cheapskate
    way to give inferior service. I am not aware of any ISPs doing
    it that way, but don't give them any ideas. Various services
    can't work properly behind a nat router because incoming
    packets can't reach you. Oh well, they don't want you to run
    that service anyway. You gotta pay more for a real connection.
    If not mistaken, due to China's limited ip addresses for ipv4, they use this method.

    Also many companies and isps use mpls and use the vrf to remember the actual route the natted ip should take back to its original private ip network/host. this means in essence that if they are stingy with addresses in the private space, they can can have more than 1 subnet serving different clients. so they could give 2 different companies the same ranges and not have to worry about the routing as the vrf will take care of it.

    it is not illegal unless u have asked for a public ip or ips in your schedule of services from the isp. as morpheus (matrix) stated, welcome to the real world.
    HO$H Pagamisa. Pro Amour Ludi....

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