Interested in career in network and security
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Thread: Interested in career in network and security

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Smile Interested in career in network and security

    Hi,
    I am a computer science degree student and I am interested in a career in network and security administration. However, I have no idea where to start in getting into this field. What type of certifications should I be studying for? IE. MCSE, Cisco, Unix? What's in demand in the market today? What do you, as network gurus look for in graduates? I understand that this field is hands on and I would like to get some experience in it. What type of positions are available in the junior level for people like me? What are the different kinds of positions you can get in to and what are your experiences in them?

    Thanks in advance,
    I greatly appreciate it.

    Laysz

  2. #2
    Just Another Geek
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    What do you, as network gurus look for in graduates?
    Something you don't have yet... Experience..
    I understand that this field is hands on and I would like to get some experience in it. What type of positions are available in the junior level for people like me?
    Start at the bottom.. Get some experience and work your way up..
    What are the different kinds of positions you can get in to and what are your experiences in them?
    Support (1st and 2nd line) a couple of years
    Administering (Windows, *nix, networking) a couple of years
    3rd line support for all of the above.. a couple of years
    security specialist (firewalls, IDS, proxies, content scanners, virusscanners etc.) a couple of years..

    All in all I did it in about 10 years
    Last edited by SirDice; December 27th, 2006 at 11:51 AM.
    Oliver's Law:
    Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.

  3. #3
    Dissident 4dm1n brokencrow's Avatar
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    Check out SANS for training and white papers:

    http://sans.org/
    “Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.” — Will Rogers

  4. #4
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    Thanks for your feedback guys.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Ouroboros's Avatar
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    Our IT guy at the company I work for is MCSE certified. Don't ask me how much he sees at payday, though. He's a salaried employee. I do know, however, that he is one of the hardest working people in the company. Go figure.

    Ouroboros
    "entia non sunt multiplicanda praeter necessitatem"

    "entities should not be multiplied beyond necessity."

    -Occam's Razor


  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    What I've heard...

    I'm not an authority on the subject, but because I am going into the same field I have done quite a bit of research.

    First, evaluate your course load and see how much of your curriculum is relevant; Usually CompSci doesnt involve many networking classes...but I don't know what school you go to and what classes you are taking.

    Second, when you are getting your certifications be honestly concerned about your knowledge. Get your A+/CCNA at bare minimum and then to make your resume more flowery go grab a MCSE and Net+, but remember that if you have the knowledge (and know how to use it) then you are just trying to impress stupid (generally speaking) HR people which usually means the more things you can shove in their face to impress/confuse them the better

    Like I said, the most important being that you can walk the walk. If you can't perform your job duties it won't matter how much money you give m$ to tell people you are smart.

    Lastly, don't forget to present yourself in a professional and approachable manner. Starting out you will be someone's bitch, but such is the way of life...be enthusiastic, be willing to learn, and make sure your potential employer knows you are a versatile individual willing to do what you have to do.

    Of course, all of my work is on the side and lately I haven't been doing too well myself, doing on call and side work so maybe I'm doing something wrong. Experience has always been my biggest barrier.

    Remember when doing under the table work that while the money may be good, if you don't pay taxes on it then you can't declare it on a resume and developing a good resume is the most important part of advancing your career.
    Did curiousity really kill the cat, or is that just what they want you to think?

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