Want to learn more about Linux
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Thread: Want to learn more about Linux

  1. #1
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    Want to learn more about Linux

    Hi all. I want to know more about linux. I am a Linux user and do know some facts about the OS. I can install software on it and can configure some of the parts of the system. I want to know almost all related to the security of the system starting from the kernel.

    Please do not suggest me books. I have lots of them and I never like reading anyone. They all seem to be boring. Suggest me some good sites or discussion forums where I can start learning about Linux design and security.

    I want to learn about networking, device drivers and administration (both network and Local computer system). I think people here will help me.

    Regards
    "Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler."

    - Albert Einstein

  2. #2
    Just a Virtualized Geek MrLinus's Avatar
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    You may want to also visit http://www.linuxquestions.org as it's a great place to find answers to questions. As to the security of the system, it is like any other system:

    - don't run any services that aren't necessary
    - limit access to privileged accounts (ie. root)
    - keep it up-to-date (patches)
    Goodbye, Mittens (1992-2008). My pillow will be cold without your purring beside my head
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  3. #3
    Master-Jedi-Pimps0r & Moderator thehorse13's Avatar
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    Re-compiling the kernel is tricky business but can be done if you're crafty. I'd look into locking down the kernel. There are thousands of sites that take you through the process.

    Now, depending upon the kernel build you have, the choices will vary so get the docs for the kernel build *before* you start clicking around in the config.

    Once you have a hardened kernel, simply run only what you need and you'll have a linux distro that is tough as a tank.

    --Th13
    Our scars have the power to remind us that our past was real. -- Hannibal Lecter.
    Talent is God given. Be humble. Fame is man-given. Be grateful. Conceit is self-given. Be careful. -- John Wooden

  4. #4
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    The best way I would say is to setup a little beater box thats on a local lan (mines 1.5ghz 256mb ram). Then install services like dns with bind, apache, mysql, vsftp/proftpd, dhcpd.

    Try an 'Enterprise-class Linux Distribution' like Centos (I'm playing with that now). Then try running something apt based like Ubuntu, you'll probably find that most of the free desktop apps are better then windows (news clients, irc clients, etc).

    I'm not trying to start the fight of which is better Linux or windows but with Linux you have lots of options. Set it up on a box that when something gos down hill you can try and fix it or you can format it and move on. I love beater boxes because you can push it more, like trying to compile a kernel with only your left hand.

    I would say start with little projects because they'll get you thinking and lead to bigger projects.

    heh, this all coming from a guy who for half of his 2 days off has yet to put pants on
    meh. -ech0.

  5. #5
    Senior Member HackerzMaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jockey0109

    I want to learn about networking, device drivers and administration (both network and Local computer system). I think people here will help me.

    Regards
    in my opinion it depends a lot on what linux distro you use, you can use an easy distro and configure pretty much everything using fancy-GUIs, and not learn the inner workings of a linux system. i advice you to try slackware, it is clean, simple and everything you configure you must do it by hand, that way you learn it the hard way, but it will take less time learning than for example ubuntu or the other easy distros out there, IMHO slackware isn't a linux distro, it is *pure* linux, its what using linux really should "feel" like.
    And one of the first steps to start exploring your linux system is to master shell scripting, you can't imagine the power you will have on your system if your a shell programmer, for which there are two books; advanced bash scripting guide, and bash beginners guide, if you use bash that is (hey it the best shell).


    EDIT: and for kernel stuff, you have to be fluent at C on order to be *familiar* with things at that level.

    site suggestions:
    www.linuxquestions.org <<- where the official slackware forum exists
    www.tldp.org << - linux documentation project
    www.firewall.cx << - networking related stuff


    Quote Originally Posted by thehorse13
    Once you have a hardened kernel, simply run only what you need and you'll have a linux distro that is tough as a tank.
    [OFFTOPIC]
    not as tough as a Merkava v.4 against an at-14 kornet or even rpg-29 (recall last lebanese war)
    [/OFFTOPIC]
    Last edited by HackerzMaster; April 6th, 2007 at 11:03 PM.
    The second step on the way to become a hacker is to run GNU/Linux. (first step is to buy a computer)
    My old skewl http://www.skoz.nl/spelevaert/

  6. #6
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    Thanks a lot for all your help, specially to TH13 and HackerzMaster. Actually, I wanted to tell one more fact: I have tried many Distros till now and I see all of them are equally powerful. Due to some problem with my hard-isk structure (actually one of the HDD has gone bad over time, I use it only for storing music), I had lost all my data some 2-3 times, so now I use VMWare. So I am ready to try out ANY distro. I do have OpenSuSE on VMWare right now and want to start away with it. WOuld it be good?

    Thanks a lot again.
    "Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler."

    - Albert Einstein

  7. #7
    Senior Member HackerzMaster's Avatar
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    you're welcome,
    you are right all of the famous distros are equally powerfull, but the difference is the "width" of the area that requires direct or manual user intervention, some have a broad area some have a narrow area, but you can do the same things in both.
    To be honest i never tried opensuse, however i have experience in suse proffessional series,
    which are great (just ask Gore about them ).

    Go to www.distrowatch.com if you are unsure about your choice, they have reviews, comparisons, software selection, pros - cons of all the distros out there, go check it out.
    If you are serious about linux, i assure you,
    sooner or later you will switch to an oldfashioned one
    Last edited by HackerzMaster; April 8th, 2007 at 04:43 PM.
    The second step on the way to become a hacker is to run GNU/Linux. (first step is to buy a computer)
    My old skewl http://www.skoz.nl/spelevaert/

  8. #8
    Master-Jedi-Pimps0r & Moderator thehorse13's Avatar
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    Your requirements will drive you toward the proper distro for you. For home use, I have Ubuntu, which is perfect for what I do at home. For business use, I have gone to RedHat Enterprise because of requirements placed on me by the enterprise.

    That said, old skoolers like myself always have a distro from the past running somewhere. In my case, Slackware.

    There are literally thousands of knock off linux distros out there claiming specialty in one area or another. Just get yourself familiar with the basics that *should* apply across the boards. Drive layout, basic admin tools, package managers, and so on.

    Anyway, have at it.

    --TH13
    Our scars have the power to remind us that our past was real. -- Hannibal Lecter.
    Talent is God given. Be humble. Fame is man-given. Be grateful. Conceit is self-given. Be careful. -- John Wooden

  9. #9
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    http://members.cox.net/laitcg/new/intro.shtml I think it focuses on slackware security and other things. A personal favorite.

  10. #10
    Junior Member d4nte's Avatar
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    I think one of the best ways to learn Linux is to start off with a minimum install and start installing new packages as you need them. I did this a while back with a Debian Minimal Install; this process shows you how everything fits together.

    Also, another suggestion would be to build a server system from scratch and administer it from just the command line. When it boils down to it, the command line will always give you more control than the GUI-equivalents of certain configuration tools.

    And I guess my final suggestion would be to get a hold of some really hold hardware and try to make Debian (or some other insanely backwards compatible Distro) run on it. You will most likely have to build some kernel modules, maybe even build a custom kernel. This is probably a good stepping stone into understanding the intricacies of the Linux kernel.
    "Few have the versatility of mind to familiarize themselves with a new system; and owing to the general distaste for all innovation, still fewer have the inclination to do so." - Immanuel Kant

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