HDD Space
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Thread: HDD Space

  1. #1
    Senior Member kingkong's Avatar
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    HDD Space

    Hi AO's

    I have recently bought a laptop and has Vista Home Premium installed in it

    Configuration: as
    120 GD HDD
    1 GB RAM
    Dual Core 1.6 Gig Intel Pentium

    I check in the system
    and i found that

    i have two drives in it
    C Drive = 50 GB
    D Drive = 50 GB

    out of which C Drives is occupied with OS taking space of 9 GB

    when i did chkdsk in cmd i found it has "111.11 GB"

    knowledge i require is

    it says to come with 120 GB but it is with 111.11 GB is the other 9 GB gone bcoz of the partition? (Where is my 9 GB)

    Finally i have 111.11 GB with me
    But finally my Total Drive calculation is only 100 GB
    Is that the space required by Vista for recovery?
    (Where is my 11.11GB)

    Thx for ur relply
    KK
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  2. #2
    Gonzo District BOFH westin's Avatar
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    You may have a recovery partition. I know that the IBM/Lenovo machines that we ship have a rescue and recovery partion... usually takes up about 7-8GB... [could be more with your system...] also I have seen inconsistencies because of the 1024 vs 1000 byte MB in Windows... doesn't sound like much... but when you get into the GBs... it can add up... I believe Seagate came under fire for false reporting of HDD size just recently... lets see.. correct me if I am wrong, but wouldn't that be a 24MB inconsistency for every GB? resulting in a 2.4 GB loss in a 100GB drive.. it is late and I have been drinking, so I am sure my math skills are off... but you get my point right?
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  3. #3
    Hoopy Frood
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    Quote Originally Posted by westin
    1024 vs 1000 byte MB in Windows...
    It's 1000 bytes == MB for HDD Manufacturers
    It's 1024 bytes == MB for Windows

    Just clearing up any possible confusion.

    - X
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  4. #4
    Super Moderator: GMT Zone nihil's Avatar
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    KK,

    The difference is the 1000/1024 notation and the fixed recovery partition. The other "missing" 10Gb may well be another hidden partition for dynamic system backups.

    At least I saw a new desktop like that a few days ago.

    I am not certain, but I believe that the fixed partition restores to the state it was when it left the factory and the other one is how you get back to "last known good"

    On the other hand, it is slightly unusual to see a store bought machine with a 50/50 partitioned drive........... did you buy it new?............. what make and model is it?

    Another consideration is the area of the drive that is reserved for remapping bad sectors?
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  5. #5
    Just Another Geek
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    Quote Originally Posted by xierox
    It's 1000 bytes == MB for HDD Manufacturers
    It's 1024 bytes == MB for Windows

    Just clearing up any possible confusion.
    Close...

    1024 bytes = 1K (2^10 binary Kilo)
    1000 bytes = 1K (HDD manufactures use SI standards)

    Quote Originally Posted by nihil
    Another consideration is the area of the drive that is reserved for remapping bad sectors?
    That's taken care of by the drive's firmware. A user (OS or whatever) won't "see" this or is able to get to it.
    Last edited by SirDice; January 16th, 2008 at 09:56 AM.
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  6. #6
    Senior Member kingkong's Avatar
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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by xierox
    It's 1000 bytes == MB for HDD Manufacturers
    It's 1024 bytes == MB for Windows

    Just clearing up any possible confusion.


    Close...

    1024 bytes = 1K (2^10 binary Kilo)
    1000 bytes = 1K (HDD manufactures use SI standards)
    Thx for the explanation of the system recovery concept of

    1000bytes and 1024 bytes

    But atleast at this point of technology no one is going to mind the 24 bytes difference per GB

    all over according to the calculation of westin it is correct for 100GB it should be 2.4GB or maybe more but it would not be 11.11 GB difference That is still a question?

    over all microsoft is not a newbie what eva configuration they have made must be having some meaning to it

    but where i talk about partition i m still not clear with it as 9 GB difference i m seeing for the frist time where as XP pro does not take that much of space ( Still i think this HDD case is to be all to do with Vista Home premium)

    On the other hand, it is slightly unusual to see a store bought machine with a 50/50 partitioned drive........... did you buy it new?............. what make and model is it?
    ne ways coming to nihil

    Yes it is a New Bought Laptop it is "Acer 4710z"

    Coming to the final Conclusion "What i Think"

    if you buy a new windows OS (Vista) then u would lose 25% of your HDD SPace

    Please Advice if i am wrong

    Regards
    KK
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  7. #7
    Super Moderator: GMT Zone nihil's Avatar
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    That's taken care of by the drive's firmware. A user (OS or whatever) won't "see" this or is able to get to it.
    Very true, so it won't get counted. Also, when the drive is first made there will be imperfections that result in drives of the same size being slightly different. However, we are only talking of a few Mb in total. I just mentioned these as a further reason why you can never reconcile the manufacturer's stated capacity to that which software applications can detect.

    if you buy a new windows OS (Vista) then u would lose 25% of your HDD SPace
    Not quite. Obviously it depends on the original size of the HDD. Also it depends on what the computer manufacturer decides to pre-install and to "hide". In other words, how they have configured the machine.

    There is usually a lot of junk, instruction manuals, and at least some limited trial of security software. All these are faithfully stored in the recovery partition.

    Vista is large but I don't know how large. The Home Premium DVD is about 2.4Gig.

    The "manufacturer's slack" has been noticeable since Windows 95 so this is nothing new.
    If you cannot do someone any good: don't do them any harm....
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  8. #8
    Just Another Geek
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    Quote Originally Posted by kingkong
    Thx for the explanation of the system recovery concept of

    1000bytes and 1024 bytes

    But atleast at this point of technology no one is going to mind the 24 bytes difference per GB
    24 bytes per GB? Not really....

    1 GB (binary) = 2^30 = 1.073.741.824 bytes
    1 GB (SI standard) = 10^9 = 1.000.000.000 bytes

    1 TB (binary) = 2^40 = 1.099.511.627.776 bytes
    1 TB (SI standard) = 10^12 = 1.000.000.000.000 bytes

    So the difference gets bigger when drives get bigger
    Last edited by SirDice; January 16th, 2008 at 11:10 AM.
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  9. #9
    Senior Member kingkong's Avatar
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    OMG,

    nihil thx a lot for the explanation !!

    u mean a lot to AO


    So now finally the concept of recovery comes clear in the mind i think my calculator has only 12 digit to come with the number of bytes u mentioned above

    1 GB (binary) = 2^30 = 1.073.741.824 bytes
    1 GB (SI standard) = 10^9 = 1.000.000.000 bytes

    1 TB (binary) = 2^40 = 1.099.511.627.776 bytes
    1 TB (SI standard) = 10^12 = 1.000.000.000.000 bytes

    So the difference gets bigger when drives get bigger
    Sirdice
    Yes
    The digit Grows higher and higher depending upon the number of bytes you carry

    Specially it would be a greator effect for the servers

    Here i a arise with another question

    how is the backup stored back for recovery

    means the DATA which takes 1 GB and it can be recovered back by just a small about of (24-30) Bytes
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  10. #10
    I'd be tempted to reformat the whole drive and set up my own partitions...that 50/50 sounds kinda silly....inefficient use of space.

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