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Thread: GUIDANCE

  1. #11
    Ninja Code Monkey
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    The best book I've found for c++ is just stroustrups book "the c++ programming language".

    I'd strongly recommend you do not pick up c first and then go to c++. The majority of the developers I know who tried that write that write terrible c++ code.

    I'd also recommend that anyone picking up programming reads 'the practice of programming' by kernighan and pike
    "When I get a little money I buy books; and if any is left I buy food and clothes." - Erasmus
    "There is no programming language, no matter how structured, that will prevent programmers from writing bad programs." - L. Flon
    "Mischief my ass, you are an unethical moron." - chsh
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  2. #12
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    haha thats what i gots C++ for dummies, that and a few others

  3. #13
    rebmeM roineS enilnOitnA steve.milner's Avatar
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    I wouldn't bother with C++

    http://www-users.cs.york.ac.uk/susan/joke/cpp.htm

    Regards,

    Steve
    IT, e-commerce, Retail, Programme & Project Management, EPoS, Supply Chain and Logistic Services. Yorkshire. http://www.bigi.uk.com

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Juridian
    I wouldn't do Visual Basic nowadays unless it's absolutely necessary.
    I'm not sure why people are still bashing VB these days. It's grown up quite a bit, with the .NET framework and all (WPF, ADO.NET, LINQ, etc). It's very easy to learn and is just as powerful as C# (outside of syntax, there is no difference between C# and VB.NET).

    I think people still have a bad taste in their mouth from VB6, which was admittedly shitty. Do yourself a favor and check out the newer versions.

  5. #15
    Senior Member isildur's Avatar
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    I took Pascal as my first language at college. I don't think it is all that popular these days though :-)
    Only trust Pipe-smoking Penguins.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by delstar
    I'm not sure why people are still bashing VB these days. It's grown up quite a bit, with the .NET framework and all (WPF, ADO.NET, LINQ, etc). It's very easy to learn and is just as powerful as C# (outside of syntax, there is no difference between C# and VB.NET).

    I think people still have a bad taste in their mouth from VB6, which was admittedly shitty. Do yourself a favor and check out the newer versions.

    You misunderstand, I'm not bashing VB. I'm certified in it and have used it to build e-commerce platforms that did a decent level of business. I wouldn't bother with it because I believe C# is a better option and you are more likely to find employment with it if you choose to look. I also believe that by doing the c style language you will have an easier time spreading out to other commonly used languages like c++, java, etc.

    As for your argument about their differences, syntax is all they have to be compared with. Everything else is shared libraries that are a part of the .net framework, not the language itself.
    "When I get a little money I buy books; and if any is left I buy food and clothes." - Erasmus
    "There is no programming language, no matter how structured, that will prevent programmers from writing bad programs." - L. Flon
    "Mischief my ass, you are an unethical moron." - chsh
    Blog of X

  7. #17
    Senior Member cwk9's Avatar
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    Python might be worth considering. I'm not a programmer at heart and code very infrequently. I find pythons great for getting a program to do what I want with the least amount of code/time.

    Few good points I like about python.
    -Run-time errors instead of compile-time errors.
    -You don't have to declare the types of variables.
    -Syntax that usually leaves you with very readable code.

    http://wiki.python.org/moin/Beginner...NonProgrammers
    Good place to get started.

    Its already been said but C/C++ as your first language might just teach you to hate coding. Keeping things interesting is also important. Think of some small projects and work you way backwards. If you plan on buying some books to help you out be careful. Most programming books suck. I know a lot of people hate the dummies books but they can make a good starting point.
    Its not software piracy. Iím just making multiple off site backups.

  8. #18
    AO BOFH: Luser Abuser BModeratorFH gore's Avatar
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    I don't consider myself a programmer which would put me in a similar situation, but I do know of a few good ones for the small amount I have done:

    I'd say first would be Perl. I bought "Learning Perl" and it's pretty good. Just remember it's an intro book and you're in no way shape or form going to master anything with it.

    For C, which I'd like to learn if I had the actual time to do it anymore, there is a book that's been our for as long as I've been born and even longer by Ken Thompson....Whcih kind of gives it some street cred...

    Anyway, umm, just yesterday I happened to be in a book store that has an actual decent computer section, which is where I spend 50% of my time in there (The other 50% being spent grabbing Horros Mags and in the built in star bucks) and they had the updated version of the C book I was talking about there for sale. Barns and Nobles is the place I'm speaking of so if you have one within your area go there as I haven't seen this book ANYWHERE else for sale. And I'm pretty sure Ken Thompson would be considered the one to write a book on C as, well, you know.

    The O'reilly books seem to be popular too but they aren't exactly fun to read if you get bored easy like me. Your best bet is to take advice from here, try a few things out, and then read before buying a few books so you know what you are looking for.

    Just be careful of publisher **** heads who think just because someone can code that it means they can write a book on how to do it without being sloppy as crap.
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