Which router to use? NetGear or DLink or Linksys?
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Thread: Which router to use? NetGear or DLink or Linksys?

  1. #1
    Senior Member codenamevirus's Avatar
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    Question Which router to use? NetGear or DLink or Linksys?

    Hi

    I have to establish a WiFi network in my office.
    The office area is around 1600 sq ft. and it'll have around 15-20 laptops (WiFi enabled) and 4-5 Server Desktops (to be connected with CAT5 cables). The printer will also be connected to router, to make it usable thru LAN.

    So, in summary, the router should have:
    1. Capacity to server minimum 15 WiFi enabled laptops (all will be Dell Vostro)
    2. LAN Ports to server at least 2-3 server desktops (actually, I already have a 16-Port LAN Hub, so maybe just 1 or 2 LAN ports will do)
    3. USB Ports - atleast 2 or 3, to server printers, scanners, etc.

    All these devices attached to the router should be able to communicate well with each other.

    Thanks to all.
    Last edited by codenamevirus; February 17th, 2009 at 08:24 AM.
    CodeNameVirus

  2. #2
    AO übergeek phishphreek's Avatar
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    Do you have any specific vendor in mind? I'll suggest Cisco just because everyone knows it and ongoing mgt of the devices are pretty easy.

    Do you require gigabit switching? What about gigabit routing? For your pretty small LAN, I might suggest a 12 or 24 port managed switch/router of some sort. Maybe a Cisco Catalyst 3560. That would give you routing and switching on the same switch as well as give you the capability to implement ACLs, etc. The 24 ports will give you room for growth and you can team your NICs on the server if you choose. The wireless is going to slow you down a bit though... What kind of data are you dealing with? Web services or are you moving large CAD files and etc. around?

    For the wireless, I would use something like a Cisco 871W to segment wireless from your wired hosts. The 871 can also serve as your internet Router/IPS solution with some memory upgrades. However, the recommended users for that device is set at 20. You may have to move up into the 1800 series SOHO equipment if you want more than 20 wireless users.

    How much $ are you looking to spend?

    I wouldn't worry about attaching scanners and printers to the router... I've actually never seen this done but I know it exists on some SOHO equipment. I've seen more people deploy printer/scanners, etc. on server or some old workstation. I would get NICs for those devices and put them right on the switch. Some of them even have wireless built into them these days.
    Last edited by phishphreek; February 17th, 2009 at 02:22 PM.
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  3. #3
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    hey Guys,

    i had a kind-of similar question to this. i have set up a few wireless networks for myself and friends; although, of all the wireless routers i have set up, they have all required a CD to set up the wireless settings and this CD has always only been compatible with MS Windows.

    therefore, i was wondering; does anyone know of any wireless routers that can be set up entirely with Linux?


    Thanks in Advance,

    - threads

  4. #4
    Senior Member codenamevirus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phishphreek View Post
    Do you have any specific vendor in mind? I'll suggest Cisco just because everyone knows it and ongoing mgt of the devices are pretty easy.
    I dont have anything in mind at the moment. However, CISCO...seems to be a good idea!

    Quote Originally Posted by phishphreek View Post
    Do you require gigabit switching? What about gigabit routing? For your pretty small LAN, I might suggest a 12 or 24 port managed switch/router of some sort.
    I dont think i need that huge switch...I only may need 3-4 ports, to connect the NICs of my server desktops. Rest all are laptops and will connect using WiFi.

    Quote Originally Posted by phishphreek View Post
    The wireless is going to slow you down a bit though... What kind of data are you dealing with? Web services or are you moving large CAD files and etc. around?
    This is ok. We dont have any LAN wiring done over here...and it would need some significant changes in my office...which I cant afford as of now. The data we are dealing is just related to software developement, calling web services over internet, etc, the average size may be 10 MB at max per file...its very rare when we require to transfer big files, for which we have Flash Drives.

    Quote Originally Posted by phishphreek View Post
    How much $ are you looking to spend?
    I am india, so according to India and the current exchange rate...I can shell something around $100 or INR 5000.

    Quote Originally Posted by phishphreek View Post
    I wouldn't worry about attaching scanners and printers to the router... I've actually never seen this done but I know it exists on some SOHO equipment. I've seen more people deploy printer/scanners, etc. on server or some old workstation. I would get NICs for those devices and put them right on the switch. Some of them even have wireless built into them these days.
    You are right about this, I can attach the printer to one of the server desktops or some old machine. and that would do the job for me...so the usb port wont be required, even though i would have liked one.

    I'll go through the links you provided and see if they are good and fit in my budget!
    Thanks
    CodeNameVirus

  5. #5
    Dissident 4dm1n brokencrow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Threads View Post
    ....they have all required a CD to set up the wireless settings and this CD has always only been compatible with MS Windows.

    therefore, i was wondering; does anyone know of any wireless routers that can be set up entirely with Linux?
    They're all compatible w/ Linux. TCP/IP is TCP/IP. The setup CD is just
    to make things easier. I've never used one. If you know TCP/IP, the
    CD's are a waste.
    “Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.” — Will Rogers

  6. #6
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    They're all compatible w/ Linux. TCP/IP is TCP/IP. The setup CD is just
    to make things easier. I've never used one. If you know TCP/IP, the
    CD's are a waste.
    thanks for your reply brokencrow; i did suspect that there must be a way. i know that TCP/IP is constant, but i always assumed that manufacturers used their own application layer protocols for configuration of wireless settings. i have managed to skip the installation CD on occasion, by navigating to the router's IP address in a web browser and using the web interface. is this what you meant? or is there an even more low-level way of doing this; and if so could you give me some details or a link to some further details?

    navigating to the router's IP address has only worked for me some of the time. a friend of mine has a Belkin router, where navigating to the router's IP with a web browser doesn't work; i just get a "Network Timeout" error. which i am assuming means that the router's webserver isn't set-up/enabled, until you use the installation CD.

    thus, if you could give me further information or a link to further infomation; about how to set up a router without the use of the installation CD nor the router's web interface, that would be awesome.


    thanks,

    - threads
    Last edited by Threads; February 20th, 2009 at 10:31 AM.

  7. #7
    AO's Filibustier Cheap Scotch Ron's Avatar
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    Many consumer routers (as well as inexpensive NAS drives e.g. maxtor mss) are based on the broadcom chip running linux. update the firmware (usually via tftp) and you can have telnet/ssh access.

    google hack linksys router linux

    http://lifehacker.com/software/route...ter-178132.php
    In God We Trust....Everything else we backup.

  8. #8
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    Netgear routers work brilliantly, i've been using one since years on my lan, and no problems till date !

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