Google OS: the end of the hard drive? - CNN - Page 2
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Thread: Google OS: the end of the hard drive? - CNN

  1. #11
    Dissident 4dm1n brokencrow's Avatar
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    I wonder how Chrome handles USB drives? My guess is Chrome users
    will use them for storage as often as not. I don't have the sense from
    what I read Google has altogether resolved the issue of local apps. I
    suspect users will have options in the end to install some local productivity
    apps.

    The "cloud" is here whether we like it or not. I know one admin at the
    local library who backs up everything to web storage as he frequently
    'flips' OS's on his laptop. He turned me onto Linux Mint as a matter of
    fact. I've got a lot of users primed to dump Windows for a number of
    reasons (viruses and more viruses).

    The "cloud" has obvious issues to me though. One: bandwidth. While
    it is true the world is being wired fiber-optically, I see sites EVERY week
    that soak up every packet. Ha!, I used to think DSL was the end all.
    Two: security. How much of your chit do you want sitting on someone
    else's server, subject to data mining (or who knows what)?

    It'll be interesting, that's for sure.
    “Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.” — Will Rogers

  2. #12
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    I just had a strange urge to post this message.... probably belongs in another thread. Why trust a public cloud tagged with a privacy statement?

    Before 9/11.... America was a American Dream ( people were alseep and could care less about reality). After 911, America was quoted as the "sleeping giant". Where am I getting at this. You are awake and noticed everything you do in public is monitored. huh? The patriot act -- new privacy laws. And yes...the "cloud" was there.

    Today is 11/25/2009: 500, 000 text messages from mobile devices have been posted on the Internet. Even big brother didn't know they were easily monitored.

    How the holy heck after years of finger pointing that some hacker get access to all that confidential information? we were told communications were knocked off. Someone got into all that chit not caring about your privacy and laws.

    http://911.wikileaks.org/

    I'm pissed because this is only the beginning. Google, Dropbox, and any other service that offer you a free "Cloud" are more interested in giving stock holders, like me, a bone or 2 of quick money.

    Some of you guys are Professionals in the IT field. When you replace harddrives in a server, do you actually erase it securely? Do you give "broken" harddrive back to your vendor? Do you lie to your customers and put their Harddrives in another unit to save time and money?

    If you answered yes...... you know not post all your crap to this " Cloud" or datacenters. These vendors think you are too dumb to know about datacenters so they "make" the media use the term "cloud". Cloud could mean that datacenter is on the border of a rouge state.

    This google crap is for the sheeps. Honestly, I'm a wolf and take advantage of a sheep if I have 2. Military once told me if I was on a sinking Carrier, my job was to destroy all the servers. so don't tell me I'm fvcking crazy!

    Like I said, it hit me that I had to post this.
    Last edited by Linen0ise; November 26th, 2009 at 06:13 AM.

  3. #13
    Disgruntled Postal Worker fourdc's Avatar
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    Linen,

    I will be replacing 3 computers in my home network in January, building new ones. The old drives are IDE and not much use to me. Once the data is safely copied off of them, they will go to the target range. A couple of rounds of 9mm from 50 yds will make the data irretrievable. From there they'll go to a recycling center that states that hds are melted.

    Sledgehammers, drills work well too.
    ddddc

    "Somehow saying I told you so just doesn't cover it" Will Smith in I, Robot

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by fourdc View Post
    Linen,

    I will be replacing 3 computers in my home network in January, building new ones. The old drives are IDE and not much use to me. Once the data is safely copied off of them, they will go to the target range. A couple of rounds of 9mm from 50 yds will make the data irretrievable. From there they'll go to a recycling center that states that hds are melted.

    Sledgehammers, drills work well too.
    Nice. I forgot all those hard working souls working customer service for a Corp. So overworked, on a break they will leave their stations with the computer still logged into the "meat" of things.

  5. #15
    AO BOFH: Luser Abuser BModeratorFH gore's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fourdc View Post
    Linen,

    I will be replacing 3 computers in my home network in January, building new ones. The old drives are IDE and not much use to me. Once the data is safely copied off of them, they will go to the target range. A couple of rounds of 9mm from 50 yds will make the data irretrievable. From there they'll go to a recycling center that states that hds are melted.

    Sledgehammers, drills work well too.
    They can still take Data off a gunshot. A few years ago, a Magazine did an experiment to see how good Data recovery was at the time, so a guy who was helping out, had gone camping, and decided while he was out, he could do some things to drives and see what happened.

    He used a 9mm bullet and shot the HD, and took another drive and through the thing nit he fire pit. The next day after the fire was burned out, he collected that drive and the gun wounded drive, and sent them in. They were able to recover almost everything even though one was almost in pieces from burning and another WAS in pieces from a shot.

    I'm not saying you should do more, because it would be silly, you aren't a CEO or high target as far as I know, but it is interesting none the less how good recovery actually is here.

    I have so far only ONCE had a drive go on me where I had to replace it. My Mom's computer had a bad drive and when I pulled it out, I used a bass amp and and something else on it, then physically destroyed it.
    Kill the lights, let the candles burn behind the pumpkins’ mischievous grins, and let the skeletons dance. For one thing is certain, The Misfits have returned and once again everyday is Halloween.The Misfits FreeBSD
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  6. #16
    Only african to own a PC! Cider's Avatar
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    Are they crazy? Wanting to store all our information? WHat happens if you want to work offline? Is there no local storage capacity whatsoever?
    The world is a dangerous place to live; not because of the people who are evil, but because of the people who don't do anything about it.
    Albert Einstein

  7. #17
    Super Moderator: GMT Zone nihil's Avatar
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    Unless you melt, pulverise or dissolve then some data will be recoverable.

    If you overwrite the data then they will not be recoverable using ordinary software.

    This becomes more true the more the drive has been used as there are so many more layers of overwritten data.

    I don't know of anyone who claims to be able to recover overwritten data though
    If you cannot do someone any good: don't do them any harm....
    As long as you did this to one of these, the least of my little ones............you did it unto Me.
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  8. #18
    Disgruntled Postal Worker fourdc's Avatar
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    At some point the restoration attempt could cross the line into data creation. Unless the restoration tool/vendor is 100% trusted can the restored data be trusted? Would it be admissable in a court of law? If the explanation of the technology for restoration goes over the heads of the jurors would it be worth even being brought to court?
    ddddc

    "Somehow saying I told you so just doesn't cover it" Will Smith in I, Robot

  9. #19
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    Google is a popular search engine. What would happen if one of google's spiders finds an identity theft page full of credit cards. The identity site has been raided and shutdown; however the cache and history of the site is still search able to the public. Google innocently grabbed all those credit cards for public viewing. All this stuff is automated. Those credit cards numbers are forever lost inside the cloud.

    Is google guilty of identity theft? Try to explain that one to a jury. It's like explaining a torrent portal is a merely a searchable tool not a pirate hangout. The real criminals moved onto something better.

  10. #20
    Super Moderator: GMT Zone nihil's Avatar
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    DDDDC,

    At some point the restoration attempt could cross the line into data creation.
    It frequently does, unless you can get a 100% recovery. Either you manually or electronically reconstruct the missing bits.

    Would it be admissible in a court of law?
    Not here (UK)...............evidence has to be real and existent, not based on suspicion, innuendo or whatever. It's the same as any other evidence.............if it has been destroyed it has gone.
    If you cannot do someone any good: don't do them any harm....
    As long as you did this to one of these, the least of my little ones............you did it unto Me.
    What profiteth a man if he gains the entire World at the expense of his immortal soul?

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