List of known Operating Systems
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    AO BOFH: Luser Abuser BModeratorFH gore's Avatar
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    List of known Operating Systems

    I'm kind of surprised I haven't thought about adding something like this to this forum before. I found this today, and I'm not positive it's complete, though I'm pretty sure everyone who comes through here, can always check if they know of one not listed and add it in.

    Nihil; If you happen to pop in, your particular experience should benefit this considering you were around for a lot more of this than a lot of people were.



    ========================================================

    Acorn Computers
    ARX
    Arthur
    RISC OS
    MOS
    Panos
    RISC iX


    Amiga Inc.
    AmigaOS
    AmigaOS 1.0-3.9 (Motorola 68000)
    AmigaOS 4 (PowerPC)
    Amiga Unix (aka Amix)

    Apollo Computer

    Domain/OS : One of the first network-based systems. Run on Apollo/Domain hardware. Later bought by Hewlett-Packard.

    Apple Inc.

    For Apple II
    Apple DOS
    UCSD Pascal
    ProDOS
    GS/OS

    For Apple III
    SOS (Sophisticated Operating System)

    For Apple Lisa
    Lisa OS

    For Apple Newton
    Newton OS

    Classic Mac OS
    System Software 1
    System Software 2
    System Software 3
    System Software 4
    System Software 5
    System 6
    System 7
    For 68k CPUs
    System 7 (codenamed "Big Bang")
    For Intel 386 CPUs
    "Star Trek" (System 7.1 running on DR DOS "StarTrek", a Novell DOS 7 precursor)
    Mac OS 8
    Mac OS 9

    Unix-like operating systems
    For Macintosh Computers
    For 68k CPUs
    A/UX
    For PowerPC CPUs
    MkLinux
    Mac OS X v10.0 (aka "Cheetah")
    Mac OS X v10.1 (aka "Puma")
    Mac OS X v10.2 (aka "Jaguar")
    Mac OS X v10.3 (aka "Panther")
    For PowerPC and Intel CPUs
    Mac OS X
    Mac OS X v10.4 (aka "Tiger")
    Mac OS X v10.5 (aka "Leopard")
    For Intel CPUs
    Mac OS X
    Mac OS X v10.6 (aka "Snow Leopard")
    Mac OS X v10.7 (aka "Lion")
    Mac OS X v10.8 (aka "Mountain Lion") (From this point on it will no long be called "Mac OS X" it will be called "OS X")
    Mac OS X Server
    For iPhone/iPod Touch/iPad/Apple TV
    iOS

    Atari
    Atari DOS (for 8-bit computers)
    Atari TOS
    Atari MultiTOS

    BAE Systems
    XTS-400

    Be Inc.
    BeOS
    BeIA
    BeOS r5.1d0
    magnussoft ZETA (based on BeOS r5.1d0 source code, developed by yellowTAB)

    Bell Labs
    Unics ("Ken's new system," for its creator (Ken Thompson), officially Unics and then Unix, the prototypic operating system created in Bell Labs in 1969 that formed the basis for the Unix family of operating systems)
    UNIX Time-Sharing System v1
    UNIX Time-Sharing System v2
    UNIX Time-Sharing System v3
    UNIX Time-Sharing System v4
    UNIX Time-Sharing System v5
    UNIX Time-Sharing System v6
    MINI-UNIX
    PWB/UNIX
    USG
    CB Unix
    UNIX Time-Sharing System v7 (It is from Version 7 Unix (and, to an extent, its descendants listed below) that almost all Unix-based and Unix-like operating systems descend.)
    Unix System III
    Unix System IV
    Unix System V
    Unix System V Releases 2.0, 3.0, 3.2, 4.0, and 4.2
    UNIX Time-Sharing System v8
    UNIX TIme-Sharing System v9
    UNIX Time-Sharing System v10

    Non-Unix Operating Systems:
    BESYS
    Plan 9 from Bell Labs
    plan 8 from bell labs

    Bull SAS
    GCOS

    Burroughs Corporation
    Burroughs MCP

    Control Data Corporation
    Chippewa Operating System (COS)
    SIPROS (for Simultaneous Processing Operating System)
    SCOPE (Supervisory Control Of Program Execution)
    MACE (Mansfield and Cahlander Executive)
    Kronos (Kronographic OS)
    NOS (Network Operating System)
    NOS/BE NOS Batch Environment
    EP/IX (Enhanced Performance Unix)

    Convergent Technologies
    Convergent Technologies Operating System (later acquired by Unisys)

    Data General
    RDOS Real-time Disk Operating System, with variants: RTOS and DOS (not related to IBM PC DOS).
    AOS for 16-bit Data General Eclipse computers and AOS/VS for 32-bit (MV series) Eclipses, MP/AOS for microNOVA-based computers
    DG/UX

    DataPoint
    CTOS Z-80 based, Cassette Tape Operating System for early desktop systems. Capable of up to 8 simultaneous users. Replaced by DataPoint DOS.
    DOS Intel 808x/80x86-based, Disk Operating Systems for desktop systems. Capable of up to 32 users per node. Supported a sophisticated network of nodes that were often purpose-built. The name DOS was used in these products login screens before it was popularized by IBM, Microsoft and others.

    DDC-I, Inc.
    Deos Time & Space Partitioned RTOS, Certified to DO-178B, Level A since 1998
    HeartOS Posix-based Hard Real-Time Operating System

    Digital Research, Inc.
    CP/M CP/M for Intel 8080/8085 and Zilog Z80
    Personal CP/M, a refinement of CP/M 2.2 with BDOS 2.8
    CP/M Plus with BDOS 3.0
    CP/M-68K CP/M for Motorola 68000
    CP/M-8000 CP/M for Zilog Z8000
    CP/M-86 CP/M for Intel 8088/8086
    CP/M-86 Plus
    Personal CP/M-86
    MP/M Multi-user version of CP/M-80
    MP/M II
    MP/M-86 Multi-user version of CP/M-86
    MP/M 8-16, a dual-processor variant of MP/M for 8086 and 8080 CPUs.
    Concurrent CP/M, the successor of CP/M-80 and MP/M-80
    Concurrent CP/M-86, the successor of CP/M-86 and MP/M-86
    Concurrent CP/M 8-16, a dual-processor variant of Concurrent CP/M for 8086 and 8080 CPUs.
    Concurrent CP/M-68K, a variant for the 68000
    Concurrent DOS, the successor of Concurrent CP/M-86 with PC-MODE
    Concurrent PC DOS, a Concurrent DOS variant for IBM compatible PCs
    Concurrent DOS 8-16, a dual-processor variant of Concurrent DOS for 8086 and 8080 CPUs.
    Concurrent DOS 286
    Concurrent DOS XM, a real-mode variant of Concurrent DOS with EEMS support
    Concurrent DOS 386
    Concurrent DOS 386/MGE, a Concurrent DOS 386 variant with advanced graphics terminal capabilities
    Concurrent DOS 68K, a port of Concurrent DOS to Motorola 68000 CPUs with DOS source code portability capabilities
    FlexOS 1.0 - 2.34, a derivative of Concurrent DOS 286
    FlexOS 186, a variant of FlexOS for terminals
    FlexOS 286, a variant of FlexOS for hosts
    Siemens S5-DOS/MT, an industrial control system based on FlexOS
    IBM 4680 OS, a POS operating system based on FlexOS
    IBM 4690 OS, a POS operating system based on FlexOS
    FlexOS 386, a later variant of FlexOS for hosts
    IBM 4690 OS, a POS operating system based on FlexOS
    FlexOS 68K, a derivative of Concurrent DOS 68K
    Multiuser DOS, the successor of Concurrent DOS 386
    CCI Multiuser DOS
    Datapac Multiuser DOS
    Datapac System Manager, a derivative of Datapac Multiuser DOS
    IMS Multiuser DOS
    IMS REAL/32, a derivative of Multiuser DOS
    IMS REAL/NG, the successor of REAL/32
    DOS Plus 1.2 - 2.1, a single-user, multi-tasking system derived from Concurrent DOS 4.1 - 5.0
    DR DOS 3.31 - 6.0, a single-user, single-tasking native DOS derived from Concurrent DOS 6.0
    Novell PalmDOS 1.0
    Novell "Star Trek"
    Novell DOS 7, a single-user, multi-tasking system derived from DR DOS
    Caldera OpenDOS 7.01
    Caldera DR-DOS 7.02 and higher

    Digital/Tandem Computers/Compaq/HP
    OS/8
    ITS (for the PDP-6 and PDP-10)
    Multi-Programming Executive (from HP)
    TOPS-10 (for the PDP-10)
    WAITS (for the PDP-6 and PDP-10)
    TENEX (from BBN, for the PDP-10)
    TOPS-20 (for the PDP-10)
    RSTS/E (multi-user time-sharing OS for PDP-11s)
    RSX-11 (multiuser, multitasking OS for PDP-11s)
    RT-11 (single user OS for PDP-11)
    VMS (originally by DEC, now by HP) for the VAX mini-computer range, Alpha and Intel Itanium 2; later renamed OpenVMS)
    Domain/OS (originally Aegis, from Apollo Computer who were bought by HP)
    Digital UNIX (derived from OSF/1, became HP's Tru64 UNIX)
    HP-UX
    Ultrix

    ENEA AB
    OSE Flexible, small footprint, high-performance RTOS for control processors

    Fujitsu
    Towns OS

    Google

    Google Chrome OS is designed to work exclusively with web applications. Announced on July 7, 2009, Chrome OS is currently publicly available and was released summer 2011. The Chrome OS source code was released on November 19, 2009 under the BSD license as Chromium OS.
    Chromium OS is an open source operating system development version of Google Chrome OS. Both operating systems are based on the Ubuntu kernel.
    Android is an operating system for mobile devices. Android is based on Linux core.
    es is a computer operating system developed originally by Nintendo and since 2008 by Google. It is open source and runs natively on x86 platforms.

    Green Hills Software
    INTEGRITY Reliable Operating system
    INTEGRITY-178B A DO-178B certified version of INTEGRITY.
    µ-velOSity A lightweight microkernel.

    Heathkit/Zenith Data Systems
    HDOS; ran on the H8 and Heath/Zenith Z-89 series
    HT-11 (a modified version of RT-11) ran on the Heathkit H11

    Hewlett-Packard
    HP Multi-Programming Executive; (MPE, MPE/XL, and MPE/iX) runs on HP 3000 and HP e3000 mini-computers.
    HP-UX; runs on HP9000 and Itanium servers - from small to mainframe-class computers.

    Honeywell
    Multics
    GCOS

    Intel Corporation
    iRMX; real-time operating system originally created to support the Intel 8080 and 8086 processor families in embedded applications.
    ISIS-II; "Intel Systems Implementation Supervisor" was THE environment for development of software within the Intel microprocessor family in the early 1980s on their Intellec Microcomputer Development System and clones. ISIS-II worked with 8 inch floppy disks and had an editor, cross-assemblers, a linker, an object locator, debugger, compilers for PLM (PL/I for microprocessors of the 8080/86 family), a BASIC interpreter, etc. and allowed file management through a console.

    On early IBM mainframes (1400, 1800, 701, 704, 709, 7090, and 7094)
    BESYS (for the IBM 7090)
    CTSS (The Compatible Time-Sharing System, developed at MIT's Computation Center for use on a modified IBM 7094)
    GM OS & GM-NAA I/O (for the IBM 704)
    IBSYS (tape based operating system for IBM 7090 and IBM 7094)
    IJMON (A bootable serial I/O monitor for loading programs for IBM 1400 and IBM 1800)
    SOS (SHARE Operating System, for the IBM 704 and 709)
    UMES (University of Michigan Executive System, for the IBM 704, 709, and 7090)

    On IBM S/360, S/370, and successor mainframes
    OS/360 and successors on IBM S/360, S/370, and successor mainframes
    OS/360 (first official OS targeted for the System/360 architecture),
    Saw customer installations of the following variations:
    PCP (Primary Control Program, a kernel and a ground breaking automatic space allocating file system)
    MFT (original Multi-programming with a Fixed number of Tasks, replaced by MFT II)
    MFT II (Multi-Programming with a Fixed number of Tasks, had up to 15 fixed size application partitions, plus partitions for system tasks, initially defined at boot time but redefinable by operator command)
    MVT (Multi-Programming Variable Tasks, had up to 15 application regions defined dynamically, plus additional regions for system tasks)
    OS/VS (port of OS/360 targeted for the System/370 virtual memory architecture, "OS/370" is not correct name for OS/VS1 and OS/VS2, but rather refers to OS/VS2 MVS and MVS/SP Version 1),
    Customer installations in the following variations:
    SVS (Single Virtual Storage, both VS1 & VS2 began as SVS systems)
    OS/VS1 (Operating System/Virtual Storage 1, Virtual-memory version of MFT II)
    OS/VS2 (Operating System/Virtual Storage 2, Virtual-memory version of OS/MVT but without multiprocessing support)
    OS/VS2 R2 (called Multiple Virtual Storage, MVS, eliminated most need for VS1)
    MVS/SE (MVS System Extensions)
    MVS/SP (MVS System Product)
    MVS/XA (MVS/SP V2. MVS supported eXtended Architecture, 31-bit addressing)
    MVS/ESA (MVS supported Enterprise System Architecture, horizontal addressing extensions: data only address spaces called Dataspaces; a Unix environment was available starting with MVS/ESA V4R3)
    OS/390 (Upgrade from MVS, with an additional Unix environment)
    z/OS (OS/390 supported z/Architecture, 64-bit addressing)
    DOS/360 and successors on IBM S/360, S/370, and successor mainframes
    BOS/360 (early interim version of DOS/360, briefly available at a few Alpha & Beta System/360 sites)
    TOS/360 (similar to BOS above and more fleeting, able to boot and run from 2x00 series tape drives)
    DOS/360 (Disk Operating System (DOS), multi-programming system with up to 3 partitions, first commonly available OS for System/360)
    DOS/360/RJE (DOS/360 with a control program extension that provided for the monitoring of remote job entry hardware (card reader & printer) connected by dedicated phone lines)
    DOS/VS (First DOS offered on System/370 systems, provided virtual storage)
    DOS/VSE (also known as VSE, upgrade of DOS/VS, up to 14 fixed size processing partitions )
    VSE/SP (program product replacing DOS/VSE and VSE/AF)
    VSE/ESA (DOS/VSE extended virtual memory support to 32-bit addresses (Extended System Architecture)).
    z/VSE (latest version of the four decades old DOS lineage, supports 64-bit addresses, multiprocessing, multiprogramming, SNA, TCP/IP, and some virtual machine features in support of Linux workloads)

    CP/CMS (Control Program/Cambridge Monitor System) and successors on IBM S/360, S/370, and successor mainframes

    CP-40/CMS (for System/360 Model 40)
    CP-67/CMS (for System/360 Model 67)
    VM/370 (Virtual Machine / Conversational Monitor System, virtual memory operating system for System/370)
    VM/XA (VM/eXtended Architecture for System/370 with extended virtual memory)
    VM/ESA (Virtual Machine / Extended System Architecture, added 31-bit addressing to VM series)
    z/VM (z/Architecture version of the VM OS with 64-bit addressing)
    Further information: History of CP/CMS
    TPF Line (Transaction Processing Facility) on IBM S/360, S/370, and successor mainframes (largely used by airlines)
    ACP (Airline Control Program)
    TPF (Transaction Processing Facility)
    z/TPF (z/Architecture extension)
    Unix-like on IBM S/360, S/370, and successor mainframes
    AIX/370 (IBM's Advanced Interactive eXecutive, a System V Unix version)
    AIX/ESA (IBM's Advanced Interactive eXecutive, a System V Unix version)
    OpenSolaris for IBM System z
    UTS (developed by Amdahl)
    z/Linux
    Others on IBM S/360, S/370, and successor mainframes:
    BOS/360 (Basic Operating System)
    MTS (Michigan Terminal System for IBM System/360)
    RTOS/360 (IBM's Real Time Operating System, ran on 5 NASA custom System/360-75s)
    TOS/360 (Tape Operating System)
    TSS/360 (IBM's Time Sharing System)
    MUSIC/SP (developed by McGill University for IBM System/370)
    ORVYL and WYLBUR (developed by Stanford University for IBM System/360)

    On IBM PC and Intel x86 based architectures
    PC DOS / IBM DOS
    PC DOS 1.x, 2.x, 3.x (developed jointly with Microsoft)
    IBM DOS 4.x, 5.0 (developed jointly with Microsoft)
    PC DOS 6.1, 6.3, 7, 2000, 7.10
    See also: MS-DOS and Windows
    OS/2
    OS/2 1.x (developed jointly with Microsoft)
    OS/2 2.x
    OS/2 Warp 3
    OS/2 Warp 4
    eComStation (Warp 4.5/Workspace on Demand, rebundled by Serenity Systems International)
    4680 OS version 1 to 4, a POS operating system based on Digital Research's Concurrent DOS 286 and FlexOS 286 1.xx
    4690 OS version 1 to 6.2, a successor to 4680 OS based on Novell's FlexOS 286/FlexOS 386 2.3x

    On other IBM hardware platforms
    IBM Series/1
    EDX (Event Driven Executive)
    RPS (Realtime Programming System)
    CPS (Control Programming Support, subset of RPS)
    SerIX (Unix on Series/1)
    IBM 1130
    DMS (Disk Monitor System)
    IBM 1800
    TSX (Time Sharing eXecutive)
    MPX (Multi Programming eXecutive)
    IBM 8100
    DPCX (Distributed Processing Control eXecutive)
    DPPX (Distributed Processing Programming Executive)
    IBM System/3
    DMS (Disk Management System)
    IBM System/34, IBM System/36
    SSP (System Support Program)
    IBM System/38
    CPF (Control Program Facility)
    IBM System/88
    Stratus VOS (developed by Stratus, and used for IBM System/88, Original equipment manufacturer from Stratus)
    AS/400, iSeries, System i, Power Systems i Edition
    OS/400 (descendant of System/38 CPF, include System/36 SSP environment)
    i5/OS (extends OS/400 with significant interoperability features)
    IBM i (extends i5/OS)
    UNIX on IBM POWER
    AIX (Advanced Interactive eXecutive, a System V Unix version)
    AOS (a BSD Unix version, not related to Data General AOS)
    Others
    IBM Workplace OS (Microkernel based operating system, developed and canceled in 1990s)
    K42 (open-source research operating system on PowerPC or x86 based cache-coherent multiprocessor systems)
    Dynix (developed by Sequent, and used for IBM NUMA-Q too)

    International Computers Limited
    J and MultiJob for the System 4 series mainframes
    GEORGE 2/3/4 GEneral ORGanisational Environment, used by ICL 1900 series mainframes
    Executive, used on the 290x range of minicomputers
    TME, used on the ME29 minicomputer
    ICL VME, including early variants VME/B VME/K, appearing on the ICL 2900 Series and Series 39 mainframes, implemented in S3

    LynuxWorks (originally Lynx Real-time Systems)
    LynxOS

    Micrium Inc.
    MicroC/OS-II (Small pre-emptive priority based multi-tasking kernel)
    MicroC/OS-III (Small pre-emptive priority based multi-tasking kernel, with unlimited number of tasks and priorities, and round robin scheduling)

    Microsoft
    Xenix (licensed version of Unix; licensed to SCO in 1987)
    MSX-DOS (developed by MS Japan for the MSX 8-bit computer)
    MS-DOS (developed jointly with IBM, versions 1.0–6.22)
    Windows 1.0 (Windows 1 - Based on Visi On) April 30, 1985
    Windows 2.0 (Windows 2) December 9, 1987
    Windows 3.0 (Windows 3 - Is the first version of Windows to make substantial commercial impact) May 22, 1990
    Windows 3.1x (Windows 3.1) March 18, 1992
    Windows 3.2 (Chinese-only release) November 19, 1992
    Windows for Workgroups 3.11 January 21, 1993
    Windows 95 (Windows 4) August 24, 1995
    Windows 98 (Windows 4.1) June 25, 1998
    Windows Millennium Edition (Windows Me - Windows 4.9) September 14, 2000
    Windows NT (Full 32-bit kernel, not dependent on MS-DOS)
    Windows NT 3.1 July 27, 1993
    Windows NT 3.5 September 21, 1994
    Windows NT 3.51 May 30, 1995
    Windows NT 4.0 July 31, 1996
    Windows 2000 (Windows NT 5.0), February 17, 2000
    Windows XP (Windows NT 5.1) October 25, 2001
    Windows Server 2003 (Windows NT 5.2) April 24, 2003
    Windows Fundamentals for Legacy PCs (based on Windows XP) July 8, 2006
    Windows Vista (Windows NT 6.0) January 31, 2007
    Windows Azure (based on Windows Vista) 2009
    Windows Home Server (based on Windows Server 2003) February 28, 2008
    Windows Server 2008 (based on Windows Vista) February 28, 2008
    Windows 7 (Windows NT 6.1) October 22, 2009
    Windows Server 2008 R2 (based on Windows 7) October 22, 2009
    Windows Home Server 2011 (based on Windows Server 2008 R2) April 6, 2011
    Windows 8 Consumer Preview (First downloadable release) March 1, 2012
    Windows 8 Server Beta (First downloadable release) March 15, 2012
    Windows CE (OS for handhelds, embedded devices, and real-time applications that is similar to other versions of Windows) May 30, 2002
    Windows CE 3.0 December 25, 2002
    Windows CE 5.0 February 27, 2004
    Windows CE 6.0 May 5, 2004
    Windows Mobile (based on Windows CE, but for a smaller form factor) April 14, 2005
    Windows Phone October 21, 2010
    Singularity - A research operating system written mostly in managed code (C#) November 30, 2009
    Midori - A managed code operating system July 21, 2010
    Xbox and Xbox 360 OS custom operating systems May 12, 2005 and August 10, 2006

    MontaVista Software
    MontaVista Linux
    MontaVista Mobilinux

    NCR Corporation
    TMX - Transaction Management eXecutive

    Novell
    NetWare network operating system providing high-performance network services. Has been superseded by Open Enterprise Server line, which can be based on NetWare or Linux to provide the same set of services.
    Open Enterprise Server, the successor to NetWare.

    Quadros Systems
    RTXC Quadros RTOS proprietary C-based RTOS used in embedded systems ows

    RCA
    TSOS, first OS supporting virtual addressing of the main storage and support for both timeshare and batch interface

    RoweBots
    Unison RTOS Ultra Tiny Embedded Linux Compatible RTOS
    DSPnano RTOS Ultra Tiny Embedded Linux Compatible RTOS
    Unison/Reliant V3 pSOS derivative RTOS

    SCO / The SCO Group[1]
    Xenix, Unix System III based distribution for the Intel 8086/8088 architecture
    Xenix 286, Unix System V Release 2 based distribution for the Intel 80286 architecture
    Xenix 386, Unix System V Release 2 based distribution for the Intel 80386 architecture
    SCO Unix, SCO UNIX System V/386 was the first volume commercial product licensed by AT&T to use the UNIX System trademark (1989). Derived from AT&T System V Release 3.2 with an infusion of Xenix device drivers and utilities plus most of the SVR4 features
    SCO Open Desktop, the first 32-bit graphical user interface for UNIX Systems running on Intel processor-based computers. Based on SCO Unix
    SCO OpenServer 5, AT&T UNIX System V Release 3 based
    SCO OpenServer 6, SVR5 (UnixWare 7) based kernel with SCO OpenServer 5 application and binary compatibility, system administration, and user environments
    UnixWare
    UnixWare 2.x, based on AT&T System V Release 4.2MP
    UnixWare 7, UnixWare 2 kernel plus parts of 3.2v5 (UnixWare 2 + OpenServer 5 = UnixWare 7). Referred to by SCO as SVR5

    Scientific Data Systems (SDS)
    Berkeley Timesharing System for the SDS 940

    SYSGO
    PikeOS is a certified real time operating system for safety and security critical embedded systems

    TRON Project
    TRON (open real-time operating system kernel)
    T-Kernel

    Unisys
    Unisys OS 2200 operating system

    UNIVAC (later Unisys)
    EXEC I
    EXEC II
    EXEC 8 Ran on 1100 series.
    VS/9, successor to RCA TSOS

    Wang Laboratories
    WPS Wang Word Processing System. Micro-code based system.
    OIS Wang Office Information System. Successor to the WPS. Combined the WPS and VP/MVP systems.

    Wind River Systems
    VxWorks Small footprint, scalable, high-performance RTO

    ================================================

    Part 1
    Last edited by gore; July 11th, 2012 at 11:33 PM.

  2. #2
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    Part 2 -

    ====================================================

    Other

    Lisp-based
    Symbolics Genera written in a systems dialect of the Lisp programming language called ZetaLisp and Symbolics Common Lisp. Genera was ported to a virtual machine for the DEC Alpha line of computers.
    Texas Instruments' Explorer Lisp machine workstations also had systems code written in Lisp Machine Lisp.
    The Xerox 1100 series of Lisp machines ran an operating system written in Interlisp that was also ported to virtual machine called "Medley."
    Lisp Machines, Inc. also known as LMI, also ran an operating system based on MIT's Lisp Machine Lisp.

    Non-standard language-based
    The Mesa programming language was used to implement the Pilot operating system, used in Xerox Star workstations.
    PERQ Operating System (POS) was written in PERQ Pascal.

    Other proprietary non-Unix-like
    Эльбрус-1 (Elbrus-1) and Эльбрус-2 used for application, job control, system programming [1], implemented in uЭль-76 (AL-76).
    EOS; developed by ETA Systems for use in their ETA-10 line of supercomputers
    EMBOS; developed by Elxsi for use on their mini-supercomputers
    GCOS is a proprietary Operating System originally developed by General Electric
    PC-MOS/386; DOS-like, but multiuser/multitasking
    SINTRAN III; an operating system used with Norsk Data computers.
    THEOS
    TRS-DOS; A floppy-disk-oriented OS supplied by Tandy/Radio Shack for their Z80-based line of personal computers.
    NewDos/80; A third-party OS for Tandy's TRS-80 personal computers.
    TX990/TXDS, DX10 and DNOS; proprietary operating systems for TI-990 minicomputers
    MAI Basic Four; An OS implementing Business Basic from MAI Systems.
    Michigan Terminal System; Developed by a group of American universities for IBM 360 series mainframes
    MUSIC/SP; an operating system developed for the S/370, running normally under VM
    SkyOS; commercial desktop OS for PCs
    TSX-32; a 32-bit operating system for x86 platform.
    OS ES; an operating system for ES EVM
    Prolog-Dispatcher; used to control Soviet Buran space ship.

    Other proprietary Unix-like and POSIX-compliant
    Aegis (Apollo Computer)
    Amiga Unix (Amiga ports of Unix System V release 3.2 with Amiga A2500UX and SVR4 with Amiga A3000UX. Started in 1989, last version was in 1992)
    CLIX (Intergraph's System V implementation)
    Coherent (Unix-like OS from Mark Williams Co. for PC class computers)
    DC/OSx (DataCenter/OSx was an operating system for MIPS based systems developed by Pyramid Technology)
    DG/UX (Data General Corp)
    DNIX from DIAB
    DSPnano RTOS (POSIX nanokernel, DSP Optimized, Open Source)
    HeliOS developed and sold by Perihelion Software mainly for transputer based systems
    Interactive Unix (a port of the UNIX System V operating system for Intel x86 by Interactive Systems Corporation)
    IRIX from SGI
    MeikOS
    NeXTSTEP (developed by NeXT; a Unix-based OS based on the Mach microkernel)
    OS-9 Unix-like RTOS. (OS from Microware for Motorola 6809 based microcomputers)
    OS9/68K Unix-like RTOS. (OS from Microware for Motorola 680x0 based microcomputers; based on OS-9)
    OS-9000 Unix-like RTOS. (OS from Microware for Intel x86 based microcomputers; based on OS-9, written in C)
    OSF/1 (developed into a commercial offering by Digital Equipment Corporation)
    OpenStep
    QNX (POSIX, microkernel OS; usually a real time embedded OS)
    Rhapsody (an early form of Mac OS X)
    RISC iX - Derived from BSD 4.3, by Acorn computers, for their ARM family of machines.
    RISC/os (a port by MIPS of 4.3BSD to the RISC MIPS architecture)
    RMX
    SCO UNIX (from SCO, bought by Caldera who renamed themselves SCO Group)
    SINIX (a port by SNI of Unix to the RISC MIPS architecture)
    Solaris (Sun's System V-based replacement for SunOS)
    SunOS (BSD-based Unix system used on early Sun hardware)
    SUPER-UX (a port of System V Release 4.2MP with features adopted from BSD and Linux for NEC SX architecture supercomputers)
    System V (a release of AT&T Unix, 'SVR4' was the 4th minor release)
    System V/AT, 386 (The first version of AT&T System V UNIX on the IBM 286 and 386 PCs, ported and sold by Microport)
    Trusted Solaris (Solaris with kernel and other enhancements to support multilevel security)
    UniFLEX (Unix-like OS from TSC for DMA-capable, extended addresses, Motorola 6809 based computers; e.g. SWTPC, GIMIX, …)
    Unicos (the version of Unix designed for Cray Supercomputers, mainly geared to vector calculations)
    Unison RTOS (Multicore RTOS with DSP Optimization)

    ================================================

    Non-proprietary

    Unix-like

    Research Unix-like and other POSIX-compliant
    Minix (study OS developed by Andrew S. Tanenbaum in the Netherlands)
    Plan 9 (distributed OS developed at Bell Labs, based on original Unix design principles yet functionally different and going much further)
    Inferno (distributed OS derived from Plan 9, originally from Bell Labs)
    Plan B (distributed OS derived from Plan 9 and Off++ microkernel)
    Unix (OS developed at Bell Labs ca 1970 initially by Ken Thompson)
    Xinu (Study OS developed by Douglas E. Comer in the USA)

    Free and open source Unix-like

    BSD (Berkeley Software Distribution, a variant of Unix for DEC VAX hardware)
    FreeBSD (one of the outgrowths of UC Regents' abandonment of CSRG's 'BSD Unix')
    DragonFlyBSD forked from FreeBSD 4.8
    Darwin
    NetBSD (one of the outgrowths of UC Regents' abandonment of CSRG's 'BSD Unix')
    OpenBSD forked from NetBSD
    GNU
    Linux (GNU Free/Open Source Operating System Software combined with the Linux kernel)
    See also: List of Linux distributions
    OpenSolaris, contains original Unix (SVR4) code. Now discontinued by Oracle in favor of Solaris 11 Express
    OpenIndiana, aims to continue development and distribution of OpenSolaris operating system. Operates under the Illumos Foundation. Uses the Illumos kernel, which is a derivative of OS/Net, which is basically a Solaris/OpenSolaris kernel with the bulk of the drivers, core libraries, and basic utilities.
    Nexenta OS, based on the OpenSolaris kernel with Ubuntu packages
    Jaris OS, based on OpenSolaris with support for Japanese
    RTEMS (Real-Time Executive for Multiprocessor Systems)
    Syllable Desktop
    VSTa
    FMI/OS, successor of VSTa

    Other Unix-like
    TUNIS (University of Toronto)

    Non-Unix-like

    Research non-Unix-like
    Amoeba (research OS by Andrew S. Tanenbaum)
    Croquet
    HelenOS research and experimental operating system
    House Haskell User's Operating System and Environment, research OS written in Haskell and C.
    ILIOS Research OS designed for routing
    EROS microkernel, capability-based
    CapROS microkernel EROS successor.
    Coyotos microkernel EROS successor, goal: be first formally verified OS.
    L4 Second generation microkernel
    Mach (from OS kernel research at Carnegie Mellon University; see NeXTSTEP)
    Nemesis Cambridge University research OS - detailed quality of service abilities.
    Spring (research OS from Sun Microsystems)
    V from Stanford, early 1980s

    Free and open source non-Unix-like

    FreeDOS (open source DOS variant)
    FreeVMS (open source VMS variant)
    Haiku (open source inspired by BeOS, under development)
    MonaOS (written in C++)
    ReactOS (Windows NT-compatible OS; currently in early, but active development phase)
    OZONE (object-oriented)
    Cosmos (written in C#)


    Disk Operating Systems

    86-DOS (developed at Seattle Computer Products by Tim Paterson for the new Intel 808x CPUs; licensed to Microsoft, became PC DOS/MS-DOS. Also known by its working title QDOS.)
    PC DOS (IBM's DOS variant, developed jointly with Microsoft, versions 1.0–7.0, 2000, 7.10)
    MS-DOS (Microsoft's DOS variant for OEM, developed jointly with IBM, versions 1.x–6.22 Microsoft's now abandoned DOS variant)
    Concurrent CP/M-86 3.1 (BDOS 3.1) with PC-MODE (Digital Research's successor of CP/M-86 and MP/M-86)
    Concurrent DOS 3.1-4.1 (BDOS 3.1-4.1)
    Concurrent PC DOS 3.2 (BDOS 3.2) (Concurrent DOS variant for IBM compatible PCs)
    DOS Plus 1.2 (BDOS 4.1), 2.1 (BDOS 5.0) (single-user, multi-tasking system derived from Concurrent DOS 4.1-5.0)
    Concurrent DOS 8-16 (dual-processor variant of Concurrent DOS for 8086 and 8080 CPUs)
    Concurrent DOS 286 1.x
    FlexOS 1.00-2.34 (derivative of Concurrent DOS 286)
    FlexOS 186 (variant of FlexOS for terminals)
    FlexOS 286 (variant of FlexOS for hosts)
    Siemens S5-DOS/MT (industrial control system based on FlexOS)
    IBM 4680 OS (POS operating system based on FlexOS)
    IBM 4690 OS (POS operating system based on FlexOS)
    FlexOS 386 (later variant of FlexOS for hosts)
    IBM 4690 OS (POS operating system based on FlexOS)
    Concurrent DOS 386 1.0, 1.1, 2.0, 3.0 (BDOS 5.0-6.2)
    Concurrent DOS 386/MGE (Concurrent DOS 386 variant with advanced graphics terminal capabilities)
    Multiuser DOS 5.0, 5.01, 5.1 (BDOS 6.3-6.6) (successor of Concurrent DOS 386)
    CCI Multiuser DOS 5.0-7.22 (up to BDOS 6.6)
    Datapac Multiuser DOS
    Datapac System Manager 7 (derivative of Datapac Multiuser DOS)
    IMS Multiuser DOS 5.1, 7.0, 7.1 (BDOS 6.6-6.7)
    IMS REAL/32 7.50, 7.51, 7.52, 7.53, 7.54, 7.6, 7.7, 7.8, 7.90, 7.91, 7.92, 7.93, 7.94, 7.95 (BDOS 6.8 and higher) (derivative of Multiuser DOS)
    IMS REAL/NG (successor of REAL/32)
    Concurrent DOS XM 5.0, 5.2, 6.0, 6.2 (BDOS 5.0-6.2) (real-mode variant of Concurrent DOS with EEMS support)
    DR DOS 3.31, 3.32, 3.33, 3.34, 3.35, 5.0, 6.0 (BDOS 6.0-7.1) single-user, single-tasking native DOS derived from Concurrent DOS 6.0)
    Novell PalmDOS 1.0 (BDOS 7.0)
    Novell DR DOS "StarTrek"
    Novell DOS 7 (single-user, multi-tasking system derived from DR DOS, BDOS 7.2)
    Novell DOS 7 updates 1-10 (BDOS 7.2)
    Caldera OpenDOS 7.01 (BDOS 7.2)
    Enhanced DR-DOS 7.01.0x (BDOS 7.2)
    Novell DOS 7 updates 11-15.2 (BDOS 7.2)
    Caldera DR-DOS 7.02-7.03 (BDOS 7.3)
    DR-DOS "WinBolt"
    OEM DR-DOS 7.04-7.05 (BDOS 7.3)
    OEM DR-DOS 7.06
    OEM DR-DOS 7.07 (BDOS 7.4/7.7)
    FreeDOS (open source DOS variant)
    ProDOS (operating system for the Apple II series computers)
    PTS-DOS (DOS variant by Russian company Phystechsoft)
    RDOS by Leif Ekblad (not to be confused with Data General Corporation's "Real-time Disk Operating System" for Data General Nova and Data General Eclipse minicomputers).
    TurboDOS (Software 2000, Inc.) for Z80 and Intel 8086 processor-based systems
    Multi-tasking user interfaces and environments for DOS
    DESQview+ QEMM 386 multi-tasking user interface for DOS
    DESQView/X (X-windowing GUI for DOS)



    Network Operating Systems

    Cambridge Ring
    CSIRONET by (CSIRO)
    CTOS (Convergent Technologies, later acquired by Unisys)
    Data ONTAP by NetApp
    SAN-OS by Cisco (now NX-OS)
    Enterprise OS by McDATA
    ExtremeWare by Extreme Networks
    ExtremeXOS by Extreme Networks
    Fabric OS by Brocade
    NetWare (networking OS by Novell)
    NOS (developed by CDC for use in their Cyber line of supercomputers)
    Novell Open Enterprise Server (Open Source networking OS by Novell. Can incorporate either SUSE Linux or Novell NetWare as its kernel).
    Plan 9 (distributed OS developed at Bell Labs, based on Unix design principles but not functionally identical)
    Inferno (distributed OS derived from Plan 9, originally from Bell Labs)
    Plan B (distributed OS derived from Plan 9 and Off++ microkernel)
    TurboDOS (Software 2000, Inc.)
    JunOS by Juniper
    Cisco IOS by Cisco Systems


    Web operating systems

    Chrome OS
    G.ho.st
    eyeOS
    DesktopTwo
    YouOS
    Browser OS
    Glide OS
    iCloud
    Joli OS


    Generic/commodity and other

    BLIS/COBOL
    Bluebottle also known as AOS (a concurrent and active object update to the Oberon operating system)
    BS1000 by Siemens AG
    BS2000 by Siemens AG, now BS2000/OSD from Fujitsu-Siemens Computers (formerly Siemens Nixdorf Informationssysteme)
    BS3000 by Siemens AG (functionally similar to OS-IV and MSP from Fujitsu)
    FLEX9 (by TSC for Motorola 6809 based machines; successor to FLEX, which was for Motorola 6800 CPUs)
    GEM (windowing GUI for CP/M, DOS, and Atari TOS)
    GEOS (popular windowing GUI for PC, Commodore, Apple computers)
    JavaOS
    JNode JNode.org's OS written 99% in Java (native compiled), provides own JVM and JIT compiler. Based on GNU Classpath
    JX Java operating system that focuses on a flexible and robust operating system architecture developed as an open source system by the University of Erlangen.
    KERNAL (default OS on Commodore 64)
    MERLIN for the Corvus Concept
    MorphOS (Amiga compatible)
    MSP by Fujitsu (successor to OS-IV), now MSP/EX,[3] also known as Extended System Architecture (EXA), for 31-bit mode
    NetWare (networking OS by Novell)
    Oberon (operating system) (developed at ETH-Zürich by Niklaus Wirth et al.) for the Ceres and Chameleon workstation projects.
    OSD/XC by Fujitsu-Siemens (BS2000 ported to an emulation on a Sun SPARC platform)
    OS-IV by Fujitsu (based on early versions of IBM's MVS)
    Pick (often licensed and renamed)
    PRIMOS by Prime Computer (sometimes spelled PR1MOS and PR1ME)
    Sinclair QDOS (multitasking for the Sinclair QL computer)
    SSB-DOS (by TSC for Smoke Signal Broadcasting; a variant of FLEX in most respects)
    SymbOS (GUI based multitasking operating system for Z80 computers)
    Symobi (GUI based modern micro-kernel OS for x86, ARM and PowerPC processors, developed by Miray Software; used and developed further at Technical University of Munich)
    TripOS, 1978
    TurboDOS (Software 2000, Inc.)
    UCSD p-System (portable complete programming environment/operating system/virtual machine developed by a long running student project at UCSD; directed by Prof Kenneth Bowles; written in Pascal)
    VOS by Stratus Technologies with strong influence from Multics
    VOS by Hitachi for its IBM-compatible mainframes, based on IBM's MVS
    VM2000 by Siemens AG
    Visi On (first GUI for early PC machines; not commercially successful)
    VPS/VM (IBM based, main operating system at Boston University for over 10 years.)
    Miraculix Russian OS, under unknown license.


    For Elektronika BK

    ANDOS
    CSI-DOS
    KMON
    MK-DOS
    NORD
    BKUNIX


    Hobby

    AROS (AROS Research Operating System, formerly known as Amiga Research Operating System)
    AtheOS (branched to become Syllable Desktop)
    Syllable Desktop (a modern, independently originated OS; see AtheOS)
    Dreckig OS (uses experimental "megalithic kernel" architecture and has a GUI)[4]
    DSPnano RTOS
    EROS (Extremely Reliable Operating System)
    HelenOS, based on a preemptible microkernel design
    KolibriOS (a fork of MenuetOS)
    LSE/OS
    MenuetOS (extremely compact OS with GUI, written entirely in FASM assembly language)
    Unison RTOS


    Embedded

    Personal digital assistants (PDAs)
    Symbian OS
    iOS (a subset of Mac OS X)
    Embedded Linux
    Maemo based on Debian deployed on Nokia's Nokia 770, N800 and N810 Internet Tablets.
    MeeGo merger of Moblin and Maemo
    webOS from Palm, Inc.
    OpenZaurus
    Ångström distribution
    Familiar Linux
    Android
    Inferno (distributed OS originally from Bell Labs)
    PenPoint OS
    PEN/GEOS on HP OmniGo 100 and 120
    PVOS
    Palm OS from Palm, Inc; now spun off as PalmSource
    Windows CE, from Microsoft
    Pocket PC from Microsoft, a variant of Windows CE.
    Windows Mobile from Microsoft, a variant of Windows CE.
    Windows Phone from Microsoft,
    Windows phone Mango from Microsoft,
    DIP DOS on Atari Portfolio
    MS-DOS on Poqet PC, HP 95LX, HP 100LX, HP 200LX, HP 1000CX, HP OmniGo 700LX
    Newton OS on Apple Newton Messagepad
    Magic Cap
    NetBSD
    Plan 9 from Bell Labs


    Digital media players

    DSPnano RTOS
    ipodlinux
    RockBox
    iOS (a subset of Mac OS X)
    iriver clix OS


    Smartphones and Mobile phones

    BlackBerry OS
    Embedded Linux
    Access Linux Platform
    Android
    bada
    Boot to Gecko
    Openmoko Linux
    OPhone
    MeeGo (from merger of Maemo & Moblin)
    Mobilinux
    MotoMagx
    Qt Extended
    LiMo Platform
    webOS
    PEN/GEOS, GEOS-SC, GEOS-SE
    iOS (a subset of Mac OS X)
    Palm OS
    Symbian platform (successor to Symbian OS)
    Windows Mobile (superseded by Windows Phone)


    Routers

    AlliedWare by Allied Telesis (aka Allied Telesyn)
    AirOS by Ubiquiti Networks
    CatOS by Cisco Systems
    Cisco IOS (originally Internetwork Operating System) by Cisco Systems
    DD-WRT by NewMedia-NET
    Inferno (distributed OS originally from Bell Labs)
    IOS-XR by Cisco Systems
    IronWare by Foundry Networks
    JunOS by Juniper Networks
    RouterOS by Mikrotik
    ScreenOS by Juniper Networks, originally from Netscreen
    Timos by Alcatel-Lucent
    Unison Operating System by RoweBots
    FTOS by Force10 Networks
    RTOS by Force10 Networks


    Other embedded

    Contiki
    eCos
    FreeBSD
    uClinux
    MINIX
    NCOS
    freeRTOS, openRTOS and safeRTOS
    polyBSD (embedded NetBSD)
    REX OS (microkernel OS; usually an embedded cell phone OS)
    ROM-DOS
    TinyOS
    µTasker
    ThreadX
    DSPnano RTOS
    Windows Embedded
    Windows CE
    Windows Embedded Standard
    Windows Embedded Enterprise
    Windows Embedded POSReady
    Wombat OS (microkernel OS; usually a real time embedded OS)


    Capability-based

    LEGO Mindstorms
    brickOS
    leJOS


    Other capability-based

    Cambridge CAP computer operating system demonstrated the use of security capabilities, both in hardware and software, also a useful fileserver. Implemented in ALGOL 68C.
    Flex machine - The hardware was custom and microprogrammable, with an operating system, (modular) compiler, editor, * garbage collector and filing system all written in ALGOL 68.
    HYDRA - Running on the C.mmp computer at Carnegie Mellon University, implemented in the programming language BLISS.
    KeyKOS nanokernel
    EROS microkernel
    CapROS EROS successor
    Coyotos EROS successor, goal: be first formally verified OS
    V from Stanford, early 1980s


    ============================

    I also thought this may be a good link to post with this. Any thoughts?

    http://www.csee.wvu.edu/~jdm/classes/cs258/OScat/

    ===============================================

    OK, so far this is it. As I get some feed back, and maybe look it over a few more times, I'll try and get it easier to read and all that. So anyone who is remotely interested in this, feel very free to reply.

    =================================================
    Last edited by gore; July 11th, 2012 at 11:37 PM.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator
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    TI-99A
    I used that system, Extended Basic, and 6 lines would beat 5 pages of Fortran programing and that math can now be done with calculator.

    I'd guess dos was the underlying OS.
    Last edited by Shay; July 12th, 2012 at 01:26 AM.

  4. #4
    Super Moderator: GMT Zone nihil's Avatar
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    OK,

    Windows 8

    The first publicly downloadable release was the Developer Preview back in September 2011. The current, and last release is the Release Preview which was 31 May 2012.

    You seem to have missed Windows 98SE (Second Edition) that was released in 1999. It does count because you had to pay to upgrade.

    Windows 95 came in two flavours IIRC. There was 950A and 950B, the latter supported USB, whereas the former did not.

    Windows 2.x ???

    I have in front of me 5 3.5" floppy disks (720KB) They are labelled:

    PC2086 UK
    1988 AMSTRAD PLC
    Microsoft Windows
    Microsoft Corporation 1981-87

    1. Setup disk
    GW-BASIC Interpreter

    2. Build Disk

    3.Utilities Disk

    4. Fonts Disk

    5. Desktop Applications and Windows Write Disk

    Amstrad was Sir Alan Sugar's company that manufactured and sold large numbers of PCs in the UK in those days because of the price. You could get an Amstrad for around £1,000 whereas my HP Vectra VS12 286 was around £3,700

    The installation is Windows 2.01 I think, or maybe 2.1; and I suspect that this is a UK variant, possibly for Amstrad only. It certainly isn't 2.0, but I don't know if there are any significant functional differences, other than that loading DOS first is transparent to the user?

    I suppose that a purist might argue that up until Windows 95 and NT, Windows wasn't even an OS but just a GUI for DOS.

    I also wonder what ran on the IBM S/32?

    This was a weird device that came as a desk/workstation with the computer installed in the left-hand end of it. Above the computer and at 45deg. to the operator was a small screen. It wasn't actually a screen, but a mirror periscope device to display the screen that was actually parallel to the desktop.

    It looked somewhat similar to the floppy disk editing machine.

    I would guess that it might be OS/32, and the forerunner to OS34/36/38, but I don't know what they actually called it.
    Last edited by nihil; July 12th, 2012 at 03:50 PM.
    If you cannot do someone any good: don't do them any harm....
    As long as you did this to one of these, the least of my little ones............you did it unto Me.
    What profiteth a man if he gains the entire World at the expense of his immortal soul?

  5. #5
    Super Moderator: GMT Zone nihil's Avatar
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    Should have mentioned these for UNIVAC/UNISYS, I used to live about 5 minutes walk from their HO in London........... I probably still have a UNISYS Cross ballpoint pen somewhere

    REX and OMEGA on old kit.............they also did industry specific variants with different names.

    The 1100 series also ran OS1100 and RTOS, and I believe that VS/9 was previously called VMOS after they bought RCA?

    If you cannot do someone any good: don't do them any harm....
    As long as you did this to one of these, the least of my little ones............you did it unto Me.
    What profiteth a man if he gains the entire World at the expense of his immortal soul?

  6. #6
    AO BOFH: Luser Abuser BModeratorFH gore's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nihil View Post
    OK,

    Windows 8

    The first publicly downloadable release was the Developer Preview back in September 2011. The current, and last release is the Release Preview which was 31 May 2012.
    I think the reason I didn't add this one in, was that it's not "truly" released yet, but yea, I am going to add that in, since I think it is their next OS. Unless they pull another Windows 2000 / Windows ME, or another Windows Server 2008 / Windows 7 or something.

    You seem to have missed Windows 98SE (Second Edition) that was released in 1999. It does count because you had to pay to upgrade.
    Yea, I think that was more or less "OK, I'm tired, I'll finish this later" and then later ends up being like 2 months. Again, point taken.

    Windows 95 came in two flavours IIRC. There was 950A and 950B, the latter supported USB, whereas the former did not.
    That's true yea; When Windows 95 hit Shelves, and people were lining up for a taste, it didn't have any form of USB yet. I think we all have seen that video of 98 crashing with a blue screen and Gates saying "That must be why we're not shipping Windows 98 yet" lol.

    Windows 2.x ???
    It's iffy for Windows 2; Windows 2 was WAY down the list, and was actually part of that thing where Microsoft was AT the Apple Convention where the first Apple Commercial was being shown, and Jobs says "We're only airing it once; During the Super Bowl" and so on, and it's when Apple Employees get back from Japan and see that Microsoft toyed with the GUI they first did, and Jobs said "How could you steal from me!?!?!?!?" And Bill Gates more or less said "Well it's not like you didn't steal from Xerox!". Proving that even back then Gates was NOT someone to trust.

    [QUOTE]I have in front of me 5 3.5" floppy disks (720KB) They are labelled:

    PC2086 UK
    1988 AMSTRAD PLC
    Microsoft Windows
    Microsoft Corporation 1981-87
    I thought about trying to find a way to upload the one and only Windows 1.0 Commercial, but let's be Honest; You can find it on Youtube. Just like the MS-DOS one from "Yo MS Raps".... GOD I can't Believe anyone thought that was a good idea.

    You know the one; There's two employees, both sitting there, and the "Upgrade" is being discussed for training, and the mad scientist looking guy talks about the new DOS lol.

    1. Setup disk
    GW-BASIC Interpreter

    2. Build Disk

    3.Utilities Disk

    4. Fonts Disk

    5. Desktop Applications and Windows Write Disk
    Heh, you got me beat man; Oldest thing I have outside of the Unix World, in which I've got a disk with the Version 1 Unix Sources on it, is PC-DOS on IBM Floppies.

    Amstrad was Sir Alan Sugar's company that manufactured and sold large numbers of PCs in the UK in those days because of the price. You could get an Amstrad for around £1,000 whereas my HP Vectra VS12 286 was around £3,700
    That's not the ONLY guy to make a PC back then though in the UK. I'm trying to think of the guy's name, but there is one more guy, who deserves to be on there. He's in Bizarre Magazine as one of the top 50 geeks of all time.

    The installation is Windows 2.01 I think, or maybe 2.1; and I suspect that this is a UK variant, possibly for Amstrad only. It certainly isn't 2.0, but I don't know if there are any significant functional differences, other than that loading DOS first is transparent to the user?
    I don't know for sure about that, but I do think you have Windows 2.01 there, and I'm almost sure you're correct on it being UK Only. I know back then, in the 2.x Days, Microsoft started thinking International Dollar Signs. A lot of which led to some funny insults by accident

    I suppose that a purist might argue that up until Windows 95 and NT, Windows wasn't even an OS but just a GUI for DOS.
    Well, Purist, or someone who wants the facts only, because let's face it, if you can't load something without DOS, then it really is just a shell. Course it looks better than that damn DOS Shell Haha.

    I also wonder what ran on the IBM S/32?

    This was a weird device that came as a desk/workstation with the computer installed in the left-hand end of it. Above the computer and at 45deg. to the operator was a small screen. It wasn't actually a screen, but a mirror periscope device to display the screen that was actually parallel to the desktop.
    If you have any way to get Photos of this, feel VERY free to upload those here!!!!

    It looked somewhat similar to the floppy disk editing machine.

    I would guess that it might be OS/32, and the forerunner to OS34/36/38, but I don't know what they actually called it.
    Feel VERY free to find Photos! If you go to a Computer Museum or something and see anything about it, snap a few shots man I can't find a thing for it.


    --------------------------

    ADMIRAL & HES for honeywell.
    Cobalt & Garnet by Palm
    Atlas I Supervisor
    Bx series for NCR Century computers
    Qualcomm’s "Brew"
    The Honeywell I DID know about from a Book I have, but I have no Pictures, and almost no reliable knowledge of this. The Atlas Supervisor, last I heard, the only one I know of left, was in Australia or something, and again, there's very little true knowledge out there. If you happen to find anything you could pop in here with, that would be nice. The rest of those I personally have never even heard of.

    Verifying this is gonna be a pain, but it would be nice to find something at least.


    And before I ppo out; Nihil; Remind me again why you never sent that Pen to me? You have my home address, and didn't think just maybe I'd LOVE that?

    Good God Nihil do you also happen to have the only TWO TRUE Original Unix Tee Shirts; One of which went to Ken Thompson, and the other of which went to a guy I used to have contact info for? They have Red Sleeves to prove their authentic. Only two were made, and the DEC Unix Picnic they will never admit to throwing, got the other ones which don't have red sleeve spots.
    Kill the lights, let the candles burn behind the pumpkins’ mischievous grins, and let the skeletons dance. For one thing is certain, The Misfits have returned and once again everyday is Halloween.The Misfits FreeBSD
    Cannibal Holocaust
    SuSE Linux
    Slackware Linux

  7. #7
    AO BOFH: Luser Abuser BModeratorFH gore's Avatar
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    Before I forget, I wanted to add this too:

    Do ANY of you maybe have a snap shot of the "Teletype Model KSR 35" Interactive Terminal? It was the Standard when Unix was first written, and yet I can NOT find even a single Photo. It's not so much an OS as it is a piece of Computer History, given that Unix, has changed the World, and a snapshot of what they wrote it on, would be nice.

    I DO have some Black and White Photos of both Ken and Dennis working on a huge machine, but the Teletype Terminal that was standard back then when they wrote it, I don't have a thing about. I can't even find a verified picture of it.

    Again, it's not an OS, but it was a huge thing back when Unix was Written, so it does belong in History. I do know it printed 10 Characters a second, and that the Control Characters actually caused a Physical Motion, but finding a thing about this thing with a Verified Photo seems to be incredibly hard.

    I know the University of Michigan had one of the very last "oldschool" Unix machines left in the World a few years ago, so I might be able to sweet talk my way through to a picture or something, given my Uncle is a Professor at O of M, and I LOVE U of M, but it's not a for sure thing.



    EDIT -

    Phil Foglio was the one who did the original Art Work, which included the first "Daemon" in it; I know because he also then became an Artist for Wizards of the Coast, along with his Wife Kaja, and I started playing that a few months after it was first released. He did it because his room mate skipped town and the Apartment had stuff in it he needed in a Wall Safe, and a Unix guy was the one who "cracked" the wall safe for him, and in return, he did the painting for this. It's the art work that then became the "logo" that was put on every Unix Manual and Tee Shirt in the early days. A guy I know has met him a few times, and again, I play a game he was hired to do art work for, so I know he may even have the original painting itself. I don't have contact info for him, but I know enough people I might be able to track him down. After he autographs a few high dollar rare cards I have I'll have to ask about that.

    I DO have a "scan" of the Art Work he did, and I may upload that for the Unix Section of this.
    Last edited by gore; July 15th, 2012 at 03:36 PM.
    Kill the lights, let the candles burn behind the pumpkins’ mischievous grins, and let the skeletons dance. For one thing is certain, The Misfits have returned and once again everyday is Halloween.The Misfits FreeBSD
    Cannibal Holocaust
    SuSE Linux
    Slackware Linux

  8. #8

  9. #9
    AO BOFH: Luser Abuser BModeratorFH gore's Avatar
    Join Date
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    Ummm..... Coffee Cup..... Tell me.... HOW THE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!?>>?????? OMG!

    Dude, I sat on Google one day for literally an HOUR looking for just ONE verified Picture!

    OMG!

    OK, just so it's "Verified" while I nut myself, PLEASE reply, and give details as to what you have now posted to this thread, which, because of that, I'm now going to make sticky.... And then I'm gonna make it a sticky at the top lol.
    Kill the lights, let the candles burn behind the pumpkins’ mischievous grins, and let the skeletons dance. For one thing is certain, The Misfits have returned and once again everyday is Halloween.The Misfits FreeBSD
    Cannibal Holocaust
    SuSE Linux
    Slackware Linux

  10. #10
    AO BOFH: Luser Abuser BModeratorFH gore's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
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    Kill the lights, let the candles burn behind the pumpkins’ mischievous grins, and let the skeletons dance. For one thing is certain, The Misfits have returned and once again everyday is Halloween.The Misfits FreeBSD
    Cannibal Holocaust
    SuSE Linux
    Slackware Linux

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